VOICES Voices Icon Ideas and Insight From Explorers

Menu

Tag archives for florida

Banding Florida’s Snowy Plovers

At first, it was almost impossible to see the Snowy Plovers as they ran along the waves ahead of me. I was walking along the surf on Okaloosa Island, part of the Emerald Coast on Florida’s Panhandle. With their pale tan and white plumage, the birds seemed to melt into the sugar-white sand beach. The…

Becoming Naturalists at the E.O. Wilson Biophilia Center

At the E.O. Wilson Biophilia Center in East Freeport, Florida, children are learning about nature by experiencing it firsthand. Developed by Walton County conservationist M.C. Davis in 2009, the Center sits on the 50,000-acre Nokuse Plantation. Paul Arthur, president of Nokuse Education Inc. and director of E.O. Wilson Biophilia Center for the past five years,…

Combating Lionfish? Try Eating Them!

Lionfish are beautiful. Their bodies are covered in stripes, and they have long, delicate fins that are nearly translucent in places. Native to the Pacific and Indian Oceans, they have unfortunately become not only a nuisance, but a major problem affecting reef health across America’s Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic coastlines. Lionfish were first identified…

Quick Take: Nature Protects People

By Kathy Baughman McLeod, Managing Director, Coastal Risk & Resilience, The Nature Conservancy This week, I’m in South Florida with partners from local government, the private sector and the international community to highlight the vital role that nature plays in protecting people in Miami-Dade County and coastal communities around the world. Miami-Dade is one of…

Black Bears Show Us How to Save Wild Florida

I am a multi-generation Floridian and a photographer focused on wild Florida. I’m also a lifelong hunter who has killed my share of deer and hogs, so when I decided to document the first bear hunt in 21 years, I tried to keep an open mind. I met my first Florida black bear up-close nine…

The Coast Guard’s First Rescue

The following is excerpted from my book: Rescue Warriors – The U.S. Coast Guard America’s Forgotten Heroes (now in paperback) Friday, August 26, 2005 The crew of the fishing boat Mary Lynn pitched and rolled in raging forty-foot seas, eighty-five miles west of Key West. With their controls gone and their vessel threatening to break…

Bombing Range Is National Example for Wildlife Conservation

Walking through a wildlife underpass from Nokuse Plantation to Eglin Air Force base feels like traveling back in time. This is some of the richest wildland in the U.S.

An Oysterman Hero in Apalachicola

On day 44, the Glades to Gulf expedition had an opportunity to spend a day with third-generation Apalachicola oysterman, Kendall Schoelles, who gives hope that the oyster fishery and lifestyle can still be saved.

March 1, 2015: Photographing a Revolution, Collecting Subway Bacteria and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they swab New York’s subways for bacteria, plan the perfect surf getaway, photograph a revolution, study the world’s most important fish, meet a glow in the dark shark, leave and return to a beloved homeland, learn the best way to eat a banana, and plan for sea level rise.

Swamp Stomping, Animal Sightings, and the Value of Trails

Halfway through the #Glades2Gulf Expedition, explorers offer tips on navigating Florida’s back country, give an update on the species seen so far, and put some numbers to the value of nature trails.

Biking Adds Miles, Perspective to 1000-mile Expedition

Four weeks into our trek we’ve covered a lot of ground, but there are many miles yet to go and much to see and explore.

Diving Into Florida’s Springs

Florida is said to have the highest concentration of freshwater springs on Earth. The Florida Wildlife Corridor #Glades2Gulf Expedition is traversing springs country near the Gulf of Mexico and recently explored several of these wonderful windows into the underground aquifer. Our first plunge was into the head spring of the Chassahowitzka River before following the river’s five-mile journey downstream…

The Last Spring: Protecting Florida’s Manatees

iLCP Fellow and Founder Cristina Goettsch Mittermeier, writes about her work with iLCP Fellow photographer Paul Nickels, doing a story on the Florida manatee. The Three Sisters Springs is one of the last remaining strongholds for this precious mammal. The warm waters that seep out of the ground year round are critically important to manatees during the cold winter months, when the water temperature drops below 68 degrees. In 2013 a record 829 manatee deaths were attributed to cold shock, underscoring the importance of these last few springs to this endangered mammal’s survival.

Watch: Sneaky Octopus Dismantles Camera

Such behavior isn’t out of the ordinary for octopi, among the most clever—and mischievous—of the invertebrates, expert says.

April 13, 2014: Cutting Cake with Jane Goodall, Saving Sparrows with Photography and More

Every week, embark with host Boyd Matson on an exploration of the latest discoveries and interviews with some of the most fascinating people on the planet, on National Geographic Weekend. Please check listings near you to find the best way to listen to National Geographic Weekend on radio, or listen below! Hour 1 – Dr. Jane Goodall pioneered studies that sought to understand…