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December 14, 2014: Survive The Horrors of WWII With the Hero of “Unbroken,” Chase Water Down the Colorado River and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they decide survival over summit glory in Myanmar, remain “Unbroken” with the hero of Angelina Jolie’s newest film, spill the secrets of Southern cuisine, track Berlin’s booming boar population, dodge los malditos on the rejuvenated Colorado River, teach kids to value the environment in school, paddle 2,000 miles to protect pristine wilderness, learn the forces that move Sarajevo’s society, and tap into nature’s therapeutic capabilities.

Food Species Top the Latest Additions to The IUCN Red List

The IUCN World Parks Congress in Sydney, Australia saw the release of the latest update to The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species™ in front of a global audience of protected area professionals, conservationists, government representatives, and business leaders. These leaders consistently agreed that survival of many species depends on the conscious interaction between our…

October 26, 2014: Give a Turtle CPR, Climb Yosemite’s Most Iconic Peaks, and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend radio, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they climb all of the world’s tallest mountains, write travel stories, pack for a purpose, give a turtle CPR, set records in the Yosemite Valley, find early humans where you don’t expect to, map the Earth, the oceans and Mars, and harvest GMOs.

October 19, 2014: Creating Electricity From Food Waste, Arresting Poachers and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend radio, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they unearth the habits of the world’s largest-ever carnivore, digest kitchen waste to cook dinner, eat like a 500 year old king, stalk Chernobyl’s ruins, trace tree rings’ roots, write a novel about elephants with a plot twist, kayak to protest dams, prosecute poachers in Mozambique, and see the unseen as a large format film.

Olazul Seeks a Healthy Solution to Depleted Fish Stocks

By Madeleine May For Santiago Cañedo Flores and other fishermen along the La Paz Bay in Baja California Sur, the solution to depleted fish stocks may lie in harvesting an unconventional product: seaweed. Don Santiago and other fishermen in Baja California Sur are partnering with Olazul, a San Francisco-based organization founded in 2009, to design community-owned…

September 28, 2014: Meeting A Mountain Legend, Skiing First-Descents in Greenland and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend radio, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they break human endurance records climbing mountains, win the Google Science Fair, eat like our ancestors, ski first descents in Greenland, vaccinate our children, chase endangered hogs in Uganda, and record a dying language.

Foodie Bees: Insects Head Downtown for Dinner

Foodies aren’t the only ones these days swarming cities in search of the best eats: Bees also prefer to eat in cities, new research shows.

September 21, 2014: Living At Sea for 3 Years, Uncovering The Largest Ever Carnivore and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend radio, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they live on the world’s oceans for three years, create the largest marine protected area, road trip down a historical highway, protect power grids from hackers, eat our way through Rome, find the world’s meanest dinosaur ever, tear down dams, spy on cats, and teach our kids to be wild again.

Breadfruit, the Tree of Life for a Hungry Planet

By Diane Ragone, Director of the Breadfruit Institute, National Tropical Botanical Garden

I’ve been interested in breadfruit since I began my graduate work in 1983. I was mainly interested in traditional fruit trees in the Pacific Islands. Then, I wrote a term paper on breadfruit, and I became really interested in its importance to plant diversity and food security.

September 7, 2014: Walking Through Conflict Zones, Driving 200 Miles Per Hour and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend radio, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they dodge whales and pirates on the Indian Ocean, track poachers in Africa, find lost societies in Orkney, shed light on glowing sharks, harmonize with melting ice in Antarctica, live underwater for 31 days, follow in the pawprints of a lone wolf for 1,200 miles, and rove across the red planet.

The Highest Conservation Price

In all the money that is devoted to the conservation of the most charismatic species, there is one that has been lifted far above what I thought was the highest plateau of funds devoted to conservation. You might at first think of the Giant Panda. You, however, as I was, would be wrong; although millions…

Seafloor Research Vessel Gets Underway

Rocking lazily in the gentle swell as our floating country of 113 people steams out to the first drill site offers me time to recollect what it takes to finally pull out of port. Stepping aboard this 471-foot ocean drill ship, which flies a Cyprus flag, are 30 scientists hailing from countries such as France,…

Oysters in the Chesapeake Bay: When Partnerships Work

By Bob Vanasse Too often, environmental groups, regulators and fishermen find themselves cast in antagonistic roles on marine issues. Prolonged legal and regulatory battles frequently top headlines, while successful conservation partnerships go unheralded. The Chesapeake Bay, long plagued by problems like pollution and runoff, is benefitting from one such partnership. Regional fishermen, government agencies and environmental…

July 27, 2014 Radio Show: Curing Cancer, Spending Summer Nights With Fireflies and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they invent a cheap cancer detection system, scour the earth’s poles for adventure, ingratiate themselves with a cheetah family, give the facts on fireflies, conjure life from the fangs of a viper, feed Africa from Africa, roadtrip across the United States in comfort, and photograph National Geographic’s past.

Feeding in the Flinders: Past and Present

Emily Hughes searches for fossils in the romantic expanse of the Australian Outback. Ancient creatures fed 560-million years ago on microbial mat, and today she admires the differences between what creatures ate then and now.