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You Cannot Save the Climate Without Trees

The People’s Climate March that trumpeted its way through the streets of Manhattan yesterday was led by communities on the front lines of climate change—and Indigenous Peoples were at the forefront of this group.  The tropical forests where they live are not only getting hammered by changing weather patterns, drug traffickers, invasive pests, and massive…

April 6, 2014: Riding Horses Across Continents, Swimming in the Arctic Ocean and More

Every week, embark with host Boyd Matson on an exploration of the latest discoveries and interviews with some of the most fascinating people on the planet, on National Geographic Weekend. Please check listings near you to find the best way to listen to National Geographic Weekend on radio, or listen below! Hour 1 – Filipe Masetti left Calgary, Alberta on horseback nearly two…

The Hidden World of Mozambique’s Sky Island Forests

PROJECT UPDATE: Civil unrest in Mozambique for the first time in 21 years has brought threat of civil war. We are therefore postponing the field work until February in the hopes that things will be settled and the roads passable by then.

Seeing the Forest for the Water: Irrigators Willing to Pay Double to Guard Against Wildfires

By Julie Mueller, Northern Arizona University How much would you be willing to pay to restore a forest that you can’t see in order to preserve water resources? Researchers at Northern Arizona University found that those who draw irrigation water from the Verde River Watershed in Arizona would be willing to pay an average of $183.50 each…

Video: Clean Water or Clearcuts for Oregon?

Big decisions are looming for management of 2.8 million acres of Oregon’s public forestlands – an area covering the size of more than eight Crater Lake National Parks. Because legislation concerning management of the so-called O&C lands could end up undermining some of our nation’s bedrock environmental laws like the Endangered Species Act, Clean Water…

Celebrating the Ingenious Skills of Tribes

From the hunting peoples of Canada to the hunter-gatherers of Africa, tribal peoples have found ingenious ways of surviving over thousands of years. For many tribal peoples, continuous immersion in nature over thousands of years has resulted in a profound attunement to the subtle cues of the natural world. Acute observations have taught tribes how…

New “Demon” Ants Named for Maya Underlords

The devil’s in the details when it comes to fearsome new ant species described recently in Central America.

Deforestation Reduces Hydropower and May Dry Out the Amazon

Last week, scientists published a study in the journal PNAS that warned that deforestation in the Amazon could significantly decrease the power output of hydroelectric dams, which are a major source of energy in the region. The study noted that although removal of trees tends to increase the amount of water that runs off the land, and…

Endangered sloths in Central Park?

Things are changing for a motley crew of pint-sized slowpokes on a previously undisturbed island ten miles off the coast of Panama. But scientists are utilizing an “environmental air force” to slow the tide.

Endangered “Demon Primate” Genome Sequenced

According to local legends in Madagascar, the aye-aye lemur is a demon that can kill just by pointing a finger. That sounds mythical, but for insects inside tree trunks, there is truth to the killing part. The nocturnal aye-aye uses its multipurpose middle finger to tap forest wood in search of its meals (see above…

The Secret World of the Old Water

Follow Octavio Aburto and Jaime Rojo in their journey through the San Pedro Mezquital River, the last untamed river in Mexico.

Declining Forests In The Eastern United States As Seen From Space

Forests in the eastern United States have become less green over the past decade. That’s what scientists at NASA have concluded after analyzing a series of satellite images compiled between 2000 and 2010.

10th World Wilderness Congress To Convene in Salamanca Spain Oct. 4

  Why would members of remote tribal communities, heads of state, Nobel Laureates, local activists, scientists, artists, and people like you plan to travel to Salamanca Spain? The l0th World Wilderness Congress will convene there on October 4 involving a great diversity of people, professions and activists who understand the importance of wild nature to…

Third Day in the Field, First Crash

Third day into the expedition, the team took their quadcopter for an unintentional bumpy ride-and caught it all on tap.

Rainforest Holiday Treats in Kenya

My name is Dino J. Martins, and I am a Kenyan entomologist who loves insects. The Kiswahili word for insect is dudu and if you didn’t know already, insects rule the world! Thanks to the amazing efforts of the “little things that run the world” I was humbled to be selected as a National Geographic…