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Tag archives for freshwater species of the week

Thousands of Baby Turtles Hatch in Brazil: Freshwater Species of the Week

This week, scientists in Brazil weren’t kidding when they said that they “hit the mother lode.” They were referring to a mass hatching of an estimated 210,000 giant South American river turtles at the Abufari Biological Reserve. It’s one of the largest known hatchings for the species, Podocnemis expansa. Researchers from the Wildlife Conservation Society…

First Fish That’s No Longer Endangered: Freshwater Species of the Week

This week, for the first time, a fish has been declared recovered under the U.S. Endangered Species Act. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposed this week that the Oregon chub (Oregonichthys crameri) “has recovered and no longer meets the definition of an endangered species or a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act of 1973.” The silvery…

New Big-Head Fish: Freshwater Species of the Week

This week, scientists identified a new species of freshwater fish in the U.S., the cedar sculpin (Cottus schitsuumsh). Forest Service fisheries biologist Michael Young said in a statement, “It’s really exciting to find a new species of fish. It’s something you might expect in more remote parts of the world, but not in the U.S.” Scientists…

New Species of River Dolphin: Freshwater Species of the Week

Scientists in Brazil proposed a new species of river dolphin this week, the first such designation for the highly endangered group in a century. The proposed new species of river dolphin, the Araguaian boto (Inia araguaiaensis), was found in the Araguaia River Basin in central Brazil. The marine mammals were found to be isolated from other…

Bird-Snatching Tigerfish: Freshwater Species of the Week

Earlier this week we reported on the first confirmed video that shows what many people had long feared: that some fish can leap out of the water and snatch birds in midair. That fish is the tigerfish, a “megafish” that dwells in lakes in Africa, and which has large, razor-sharp teeth. Widely distributed across much…

Bizarre Mystery Fish Identified: Species of the Week

Earlier this week, an angler in Borneo caught an unusual-looking fish, which caused quite a stir online. Reported the Borneo Post: The mystery fish has a large head and is covered with sharp spines on the top and bottom of its body. Its body gets progressively smaller towards the tail. The fish measuring over one…

New Species of Giant Air-Breathing Fish: Freshwater Species of the Week

Water Currents previously reported on Donald Stewart‘s ongoing efforts to reclassify a giant Amazonian fish as representing several distinct species. The work of the fish biologist at the SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry (ESF) is supported in part by National Geographic. Stewart’s latest work has just been published in the journal Copeia, and marks…

Beaver Butts Emit Goo Used for Vanilla Flavoring

Just in time for holiday cookie season, we’ve discovered that the vanilla flavoring in your baked goods and candy could come from the anal excretions of beavers.

Fish That Lay Eggs Out of the Water: Freshwater Species of the Week

These fish are born out of water.  The fish Copella arnoldi is commonly called the splash tetra or splashing tetra, due to its unique reproductive behavior. That is, it lays its eggs outside of water. It is one of few known species of fish in the world to do so. When a male is ready to mate, it…

Iconic Ganges River Dolphin: Freshwater Species of the Week

  Conservation India reports that an endangered Ganges river dolphin (or Gangetic dolphin, Platanista gangetica gangetica), was killed by villagers in Assam this week. A fishmonger was seen selling the marine mammal’s meat at a roadside market in Lezai-Kalakhowa. The Ganges river dolphin is the national aquatic animal of India. It lives in the freshwater of the Ganges…

Giant Dobsonflies: Freshwater Species of the Week

A couple of months ago, I went camping in Harpers Ferry, West Virginia. Not exactly roughing it, I stayed at a campground with such amenities as a pancake house, a giant trampoline, and a pool. One evening, while relaxing in the pool, enjoying the views of the surrounding hills, I got a start. A giant…

Missing “Rain Frog” Resurfaces in Honduras: Freshwater Species of the Week

In 2008, National Geographic Young Explorer Jonathan Kolby re-discovered a frog species endemic to Honduras that had been declared extinct. The amphibian had vanished mysteriously in the mid 1980s. Now, the Australia-based Kolby told us via email, “I’ve been searching for more proof of its existence every year since, and finally found a second one a…

Hellbenders Reintroduced in New York: Freshwater Species of the Week

The Eastern hellbender–also called a snot otter, devil dog, mud dog, grampus, or Allegheny alligator–is one of the world’s largest species of salamander. The animal, formally Cryptobranchus alleganiensis, has been declining and is officially listed as “near threatened” by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature. Much larger than any other salamanders in their range, hellbenders…

Live Bear and Salmon Cams Bring Nature Up Close

Nature programs often show the annual congregation of bears at streams during salmon runs, but few people get to actually see them up close. Now, National Geographic partner Explore.org offers Internet users an intimate look at this feeding frenzy (above, or view cam here). The cam shows live footage from Alaska’s Brooks River in Katmai…

Tiny New Catfish Species: Freshwater Species of the Week

We’ve written before in Water Currents how scientists project that there are many species of freshwater fish yet to be described. Now, scientists have published a report in the journal Zookeys about a new species of catfish, one so tiny that it is among the smallest in the group. Scientists found it in the waters of Rio…