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Tag archives for Genographic Project

Celebrate DNA Day with Genographic! Join, Search and Learn

Join us at National Geographic in wishing every past, current, and future Genographic Project participant a Happy DNA Day! Sixty-three years ago today a ground-breaking paper was published that introduced us to the double helix and revealed the structure of DNA, catapulting forward the field of genetics. The scientific world never looked back. Eleven years…

Genographic Researchers in Australia Uncover Unique Branches of the Human Family Tree

by Amy Werner Are You Up on Geno Research Down Under? Genographic Project scientists in Melbourne, Australia have just published their exciting new finds from years of work across the vast southern continent. Detailed in a new paper in the American Journal of Physical Anthropology, Dr. Robert Mitchell, student Nano Nagle, and their team of…

Genographic Sets Sail to the Dominican Republic

‘The Dominican Republic has it all.’  That phrase is not just the slogan that tourists see when visiting the beautiful Caribbean nation, but it is also what a team of geneticists and anthropologists are hoping to show as they embark on a one-of-a-kind study across the eastern half of the island of Hispañola. Drs. Theodore…

Genographic Scientists Trace the Origins of Europe’s Roma

by Amy Werner The European Roma are the largest ethnic minority in Europe, numbering more than 10 million people dispersed across the continent. Roma groups have a distinct culture and language, different from their non-Roma neighbors, suggesting a common origin generally placed in South Asia. However, little is known about their deep history and the…

‘Geno 2.0: Next Generation’ Reveals New Details of Your Ancient Ancestry

Geno 2.0: Next Generation (Geno NextGen) is the next phase of the Genographic Project, National Geographic’s pioneering effort to decode the story of individuals’ deep ancestry hidden within their DNA. Geno NextGen builds on the success of Geno 2.0 by growing the analytical capabilities of the test and enhancing the participant Geno 2.0 experience. Here…

Genographic Project Participants Help Refine Human Family Tree

The Genographic Project recently released the most refined evolutionary tree of the human Y chromosome, which every male inherits directly from his father. The new Y tree was created in part through the help of the 300,000 male participants that have joined this one-of-a-kind project to trace their own ancestry and become citizen scientists. As more…

The Genographic Project unveils the ancient ancestry of New Zealand, the world’s last settled islands

The Genographic Project results are in from 100 Kiwis (or New Zealanders). The results were revealed to an excited crowd of participants, which included New Zealand’s own Governor General Sir Jerry Mateparae. Background Earlier this year, a team from National Geographic’s Genographic Project was invited by the Allan Wilson Centre to North Island, New Zealand to shed…

Ancient DNA From Teenage Girl Shows Link Between Ancient and Modern Americans

Deep in the flooded underground caves of Hoyo Negro in Mexico’s Yucatan peninsula a team of archaeologists recently unearthed a treasure trove of prehistoric remains that included the oldest human skeleton found to date in the Americas.  Falling to her death, the nearly intact skeleton is that of a teenage girl affectionately nicknamed Naia. She…

Chickens and Dogs and Bears, Oh My (DNA)

Why did the chicken cross the road? We may never know. But since it did, and it carried its DNA, we can now say something about both chicken and human migration. Yes, using DNA to trace migration and history is not limited to just humans. A new paper on polar and brown bear DNA suggests…

Tracing New Zealanders’ Genetic History

The Genographic Project team continues their expedition to New Zealand, tracing the journeys of some of the island’s most ancient and most recent populations.

A Ngāi Tāmanuhiri Greeting From Muriwai, New Zealand

Greetings are different all over the world. We shake hands and say “nice to meet you” or sometimes just a wave across the room is sufficient. The Ngāi Tāmanuhiri, a New Zealand iwi or Maori community located across the bay from Gisborne, perform a spiritual greeting called a powhiri that includes singing, dancing and a…

The Genographic Team Goes to New Zealand

Kia ora, or Hello from Gisborne, a small city on the east coast of the North Island of New Zealand. Just west of the International date line, Gisborne claimed for years to be the first city in the world to see each new day’s sunrise, but for political reasons the title is now held by…

The Fine Tapestry of the Kaqchikel Women of Guatemala

See the artistry of Kaqchikel women’s weaving in Guatemala, and hear how maintaining this craft is helping keep culture and inspiration alive.

Ancient DNA from Montana Skeleton Holds Clues to Native American Ancestry

DNA from the skeleton of an ancient boy from Montana may just hold clues revealing who the first Native Americans were and where they came from. A recent paper in the journal Nature details the results from the 12,500-year-old infant boy’s genome. The boy, nicknamed Anzick-1 in reference to the owner of the land where…

Testing the Genetic Diversity of College Students in New York City

Two-hundred university students trudged through the snowy New York City streets to swab their cheeks and trace their ancient ancestry with the Genographic Project on Monday evening at the American Museum of Natural History. Students from over eight local Universities were given the unique opportunity to test their DNA with the Geno 2.0 DNA Ancestry…