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Tag archives for geology

Watch: Inside the World’s Longest Sea Caves

Geologist and National Geographic grantee Nicolas Barth was studying active faults on New Zealand’s South Island when he decided to climb down some cliffs and go for a swim. That’s when he discovered the longest sea cave in the world.

Best Job Ever: Exploring Super-Remote Caves in Greenland

Geologist Gina Moseley started caving for sport when she was 13 years old, and now she’s in it for science. Moseley is constructing the first cave-based record of past climate change for Greenland.

Climbing Into Volcanoes, Collecting Rocks—and Hopefully Saving Lives

When a growing population lives below two major volcanoes, someone better figure out how they work.

Minerals are Essential to address Climate Change and meet Sustainable Development Goals

In 2013, the International Union of Geological Sciences (IUGS) launched the Resourcing Future Generations (RFG) initiative to bring world attention to the challenges of sustaining resource supplies. The RFG initiative includes a diverse group of geoscientists, environmental and social scientists and economists, drawn from a range of institutions with diverse private and public experience in…

Sangay Volcano Erupts in Ecuador

In December we’d been walking on its slopes, collecting rock samples. One month after we departed, Sangay started erupting with ferocity again.

Collecting Clues to Solve a Volcanic Mystery

After nearly two weeks on its slopes and summit, we are now one step closer to understanding the genesis, evolution, and future of Sangay volcano in Ecuador.

A Volcanic Adventure on “The Giver”

Ken Sims is off to explore another volcano—this time in the dizzying reaches of Ecuador’s highlands. The Sangay volcano is one of the most remote, dangerous and active volcanoes in the world, and Ken wants to collect lava samples as they erupt from the summit.

Ethiopia’s Bentonite Trail: A Development Path?

By Rodger Barnes In this guest post Rodger Barnes  reports from the Afar region of Ethiopia on the mining of bentonite – an aluminum phyllo-silicate mineral used in drilling processes worldwide. Industrial minerals are often overlooked in the mining and development discourse although they clearly have a potential to make a social and economic contribution…

Ross Island 2014: Journey’s End

Ken Sims’ expedition to Ross Island in Antarctica is wrapping up. Having narrowly obtained the samples he needed, Ken reflects on the dangers endured in this remote ice-desert for the sake of science and exploration.

The Scarce Mineral Behind the 2014 Nobel Prize in Physics

  This year’s Nobel Prize in Physics is thankfully not being awarded for the discovery of some esoteric atomic particle but rather for the development of a technology that impacts all our lives. The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences noted in its announcement that the prize was awarded to 3 scientists who “invented a new…

Breaking Down Rocks in the Deep Ocean

When I witness adults cooing over Eocene-era rocks, or tasting 15 million-year-old ocean sediments, I instantly wonder what their childhood was like. Were they kids that didn’t want to leave the sandbox after recess? Were they shy and looked at the ground more than they looked at the sky? Why curiosity for inanimate objects over, say, plants or something with eyes and a heart?

Iceland: Raw, Rugged, and a Warm-Up for Mars

In Iceland, Bethany Ehlmann is touring with students to learn more about the dynamic geological processes that mold and carve our planet in order to learn about other planets, particularly Mars. Her expedition kicks off with some amazing sights and the threat of a nearby volcanic eruption imminent.

Seafloor Research Vessel Gets Underway

Rocking lazily in the gentle swell as our floating country of 113 people steams out to the first drill site offers me time to recollect what it takes to finally pull out of port. Stepping aboard this 471-foot ocean drill ship, which flies a Cyprus flag, are 30 scientists hailing from countries such as France,…

101 Geysers Spotted Erupting From Saturn Moon

NASA’s Cassini spacecraft team have numbered the plumes of Saturn’s moon, Enceladus.

Signs of Spring on American Prairie Reserve

By Damien Austin Freezing rain has left inches of ice across a snow-crusted prairie. A few days from now the creeks will be running high as warm weather moves in to unravel the layers of winter. It’s also the time of year when my two young daughters stand at the kitchen windows with their faces…