VOICES Voices Icon Ideas and Insight From Explorers


Tag archives for global warming

Uniting Ocean and Earth for Climate Action

This winter, the United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP21) in Paris will feature one of the largest gatherings of world leaders to ever address global warming. The stage is set for all United Nations member states to come together and create an international agreement on the climate with the goal of keeping global warming below…

Learning From Indigenous Peoples on Climate Change

Many of the people likely to be on the front lines of a changing climate are indigenous. Already assaulted by centuries of colonialism and exploitation, many indigenous people must also now adapt to rising seas, warming temperatures, and other disruptions to natural systems. Conservation biologist Gleb Raygorodetsky has been traveling the world to document stories…

New Study Showed Spawning Frequency Regulates Species Population Networks on Coral Reefs

New research on tropical coral reef ecosystems showed that releasing larvae more often is beneficial for a species’ network. The study on reproductive strategies is critical to assess the conservation of coral reef ecosystems worldwide. Researchers from the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science used a computer model developed by…

Next Stop on Road to a Climate Agreement in Paris: Geneva

The latest round of climate talks began Feb. 8 in Geneva, where representatives of 190 or so countries have their work cut out for them: streamlining a 37-page draft text of an international agreement covering more than 100 issues, each with multiple options and sub-options, so that a full negotiating text is ready by May…

Obama Addresses Climate Change with Proposed 2016 Budget

In an effort to increase energy security and resilience to climate change, President Obama’s fiscal 2016 budget proposes a 7 percent increase in funding for clean energy and a new $4 billion Clean Power State Initiative Fund aimed at encouraging U.S. states to make faster and deeper cuts in power plant emissions. The proposed $4…

U.S.-India Climate Agreement Less Substantive Than U.S.-China Climate Deal

The U.S.-India climate agreement announced January 25 creates a new agreement between the second- and third-largest emitters of greenhouse gases in the world but does not have the strength of the U.S.-China climate deal reached last year. Rather than committing India to cap its emissions, the U.S.-India deal called for “enhancing bilateral climate change cooperation”…

Obama Tackles Climate Change in State of the Union Address

“No challenge — no challenge — poses a greater threat to future generations than climate change,” said President Obama in his 2014 State of the Union address. “The best scientists in the world are all telling us that our activities are changing the climate,” he said, “and if we do not act forcefully, we’ll continue to see rising oceans,…

House and Senate Votes, Court Decision Shorten Road to Keystone Decision

On Monday the Senate passed a bill approving the Keystone XL pipeline in a procedural vote just shy of the 67 votes needed to override a veto, setting up what could be an extensive debate on energy policy and climate in next year’s presidential election. The move followed a bipartisan vote in which the House…

Missing Isotopes: What’s Happening in the World’s Highest Glaciers?

On the roof of the world in Tibet, Natalie Kehrwald and her colleagues have made a surprising discovery about climate and glaciers.

Woods Hole Research Center responds to misleading NY Times op-ed on climate change

  Climate scientists everywhere reacted with stunned outrage  as word spread about an op-ed piece in the New York Times on Sept. 20, 2014 under the headline: “To Save The Planet, Don’t Plant Trees.” Operating on kernals of truth that distort and misinterpret far larger facts and realities about the role of forests — tropical…

Crashing Into Ice: The Impact of Climate Change, on My Head

Ruby, Françoise, and I are barefoot and wearing t-shirts as we conduct sea bird surveys from the prow of the M/V Cape Race. Between shifts we close our eyes, the sun warms our faces and it feels downright tropical. Opening our eyes again, we are reminded of where we are. Looming in the distance are massive, glassy ice bergs, which we will soon be swimming by.

Political and Weather Climates are Changing, But at What Speed?

The weather in Washington, D.C. finally turned hot in September, just in time for Congress to resume. We enjoyed an unusually moderate summer this year, with many days topping out in the high seventies or low eighties. Plenty of sun. San Diego weather, you might say. Before September, we were missing about two full weeks…

“Extinct” Snail Found Alive—But for How Long?

“So I was wrong,” scientist says about extinction—but cautions the purple-and-pink mollusk is still perilously close to dying out.

Wild at 50: The Wilderness Act Turns a Half-Century

By John Weaver

Recently, some neo-conservationists have argued that the Wilderness Act is facing a mid-life crisis, that somehow the notion of Wilderness is an anachronism in the ‘Anthropocene’ era of human domination of the planet. They argue that we should focus on domesticating landscapes to serve economic growth of the human juggernaut – rather than protecting remaining wild lands and preventing human-caused extinction of species. Other conservationists – myself included – disagree.

Global Warming Boosting Reindeer on Norwegian Island—For Now

Reindeer on Norway’s Svalbard archipelago are bucking the trend and thriving, according to a long-term study.