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Tagging Adorable, Nasty Little Penguins: #bestjobever

The world has had a love affair with penguins for some time now. Their tuxedo-colored feathers, waddling walk, and awkward mannerisms make them easy to adore. But get too close to penguins—chinstrap penguins in particular—and your endearing perception of these birds may be tested, given their penchant for projectile pooping and beating each other up.

Best Job Ever: Lion First Responder Team

Paola Bouley is on call as a first responder for lions in Gorongosa National Park in Mozambique. She is a National Geographic Big Cats Initiative grantee and the director and co-founder of Projecto Leões da Gorongosa. It’s the first ever lion research project in the history of the park. Bouley and her team work to…

Into the Lions Den: Diffusing a Lion Hunting Party

Post submitted by Eric LeFlore and Andrew Stein.  It’s 6am on a Friday morning and the kettle has just boiled for morning tea when the phone rings. After some pleasant introductions in Setswana, the main reason for the call comes up. The conversation is quick but the angst is apparent. I hear from the other…

Best Job Ever: Exploring Super-Remote Caves in Greenland

Geologist Gina Moseley started caving for sport when she was 13 years old, and now she’s in it for science. Moseley is constructing the first cave-based record of past climate change for Greenland.

Best Job Ever: Collecting Bones in Alaska

Imagine if you could go out walking and easily pick up something that hasn’t been touched for hundreds, or even thousands, of years. Conservation paleobiologist and National Geographic grantee Dr. Joshua Miller does bone surveys on the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) in Alaska to study why critical habitats for caribou and other species have changed over time. Miller says, “Anytime we do a survey, we’re finding scores and scores of bones.”

Best Job Ever: Living With Mongolian Nomads

What’s it like to live among modern Mongolian nomads? From throwing himself into traditional wrestling matches where he faces certain crushing defeats to riding galloping horses across the Mongolian steppe, National Geographic grantee Chris Bashinelli tries to find out.

Exploring Toxic Ice Caves in an Active Volcano

National Geographic grantee Eduardo Cartaya and his team descend into a volcano’s toxic ice caves on a mission to protect climbers and learn about microbial life in this eerie, otherworldly environment.

Tense Standoff With a Male Elephant in Mating Mode

National Geographic filmmaker Bob Poole encounters a giant bull elephant at the worst possible time … mating season. During this time male elephants are known for their aggressive and territorial nature, and Poole may be too close for comfort.

Climbers Get Blasted by Sandstorm 1,000 Feet Up

Climbers Alex Honnold and Cedar Wright set out to climb 45 of the most iconic towers in the American Southwest, including spires over 1,000 feet tall. But the climbs were made all the more risky when the duo was blasted by sandstorms for three weeks straight.

Collecting Poop to Save a National Park

Wildlife ecologist and National Geographic grantee Jen Guyton works to bring wildlife back to a park ravaged by war. But her efforts involve getting up close and personal with the back ends of said wildlife, proving that science isn’t for the squeamish.

Meet the Explorers Crossing the World’s 20 Largest Glaciers for Climate Change

Over the course of ten years, polar explorer and National Geographic grantee Børge Ousland and his expedition partner, Vincent Colliard, are crossing the world’s 20 largest glaciers to document climate change. But traversing some of the harshest landscapes on Earth won’t keep these two adventurers from having a good time.

Seal Pups: Ferociously Cute and Worth Protecting

Fur seal pups may be the cutest creatures in Antarctica—but they can give some serious attitude, as National Geographic grantee and wildlife biologist Douglas Krause finds out when he tries to make sure these animals are as healthy as they are adorable.

WATCH: Billions of Bugs Feast on Flesh and Dung in Borneo

Just in time for Halloween, follow cave ecologist and National Geographic grantee Donald McFarlane through Borneo’s “Cockroach Cave,” where every surface vibrates with cockroaches and other guano-grubbing and flesh-feasting creepy-crawlies.

Extreme Cave Diving with a Purpose

Follow Kenny Broad, an environmental anthropologist and National Geographic Expeditions Council grantee, as he explores a narrow underwater cave in the Bahamas.

On the Trail of a Puma

After seeing pumas, their tracks, and their kills all week, we started catching them. Now five of San Guillermo’s pumas are wearing satellite collars that will show us what they’re killing, where, and how – giving us a new window into the workings of high Andean ecosystems.