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Beyond the textbooks: in Singapore, Japanese Peace Boat passengers reflect on the Sook Ching massacre [Kota Kinabalu to Singapore]

  On Friday 28 November, Sabah tour guide Akmal gave 33 Japanese Peace Boat passengers a whistle stop tour of the Sabah Museum in Kota Kinabalu. The group’s itinerary – which also included a visit to a public zoo and a heritage village, lunch, and allotted time for souvenir shopping – was tight, and they…

December 7, 2014: Return “Kidnapped” Animals to the Wild, Save the World’s Big Cats and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they climb El Capitan with young children, stop the kidnapping of Brazil’s wildlife, save lions by saving livestock, lift a 35-ton stone with prehistoric technology, work to save the last 3,000 wild tigers, visit some of the last nomadic tribes, bottle feed a baby cheetah, and clean up hazardous waste.

November 16, 2014: Speed Climb 3,000 Foot Walls, Meet the Darwin of NYC’s Rodent World and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they set a speed record on El Capitan, prosecute poaching kingpins, share survival tips for extreme weather, dig up clues on ancient tsunamis to study for future risk, hold our breath to survive a surfing disaster, call the Malagasy military for an airlift, understand the evolution of New York’s rats, and mourn the Sherpa guides and porters lost on Everest.

Why We “Celebrate” Threatened Species

Yesterday I met Lonesome George. He was the last of his kind and he is now displayed in taxidermy at the American Museum of Natural History in New York. He’s tucked away under a glass case in an alcove on the 4th floor amidst other extinct species, but, none of their extinctions are nearly as…

1833 Meteor Storm Started Citizen Science

Crowdsourcing astronomy discoveries goes back a ways, to 1833, and a truly remarkable meteor shower.

July 27, 2014 Radio Show: Curing Cancer, Spending Summer Nights With Fireflies and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they invent a cheap cancer detection system, scour the earth’s poles for adventure, ingratiate themselves with a cheetah family, give the facts on fireflies, conjure life from the fangs of a viper, feed Africa from Africa, roadtrip across the United States in comfort, and photograph National Geographic’s past.

Faces of the Past, Reflections of the Present at Archaeology Conference

We can find reflections of ourselves in ancient cultures if we know how to look. Explore top archaeologists’ latest ideas from the 2014 Dialogue of Civilizations, and share your thoughts as well.

Space Shuttle 747 to Land in Museum

The jumbo jet that first carried a space shuttle coast to coast will land in a museum next month, scheduled to forever bear a copy of its most famous passenger. NASA 905 was the first of two Boeing 747 passenger jets modified by the space agency to wing space shuttles from landing runways back to…

Sesquicentennial: Giving New Life to the Civil War’s Second Bloodiest Battle

One hundred and fifty years ago, the United States was locked in a bloody Civil War. The drama has faded into the past for many, but for those living in towns surrounded by war’s battlefields, history’s echoes still roar through the hills.

October 13, 2013: Arctic Double Dating, Poisoning Rhinos to Save Them, and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson as we we ski and kayak across Baffin Island, poison rhinos to save them, and meet child soldiers while bearing witness to illicit mines in one of the world’s poorest countries.

Europe’s Early Settlers Uncovered

Europe’s Stone Age settlers migrated in waves that replaced older hunter-gatherer cultures, suggests a study that looks at European DNA, both ancient and modern. The results reported in the journal, Science, answer questions about the peopling of modern-day Europe. Some of our ancestors hunted wild animals and gathered plants to survive, while others were discovering agriculture, and…

Google Doodle Focuses On Foucault’s Pendulum

Suspended from the dome of the Pantheon in Paris in 1851, the pendulum designed by Léon Foucault was a first demonstration of the Earth’s rotation. Today it is the subject of a Google Doodle honoring the French physicist and his invention. The original Foucault’s Pendulum consisted of a steel ball hung 22 feet (6.7 meters)…

Nome Sweet Home: Finding a Place to Live in Nome, Alaska

Our lodgings in Nome has a rich history… but no heat.

Lost for Decades, a Beguiling Curio from Egypt’s Royal Past

One afternoon a few years ago, a friend and I had ducked out of Egypt’s summer heat and into the luxury Semiramis Hotel in downtown Cairo in search of a foreign newspaper. As we reached the doorway of the cramped gift shop, an elderly man, well-dressed, a slight tremble to his hands, came ambling out…

New Orleans BioBlitz, 18th-Century Edition

Three thousand people explored the Louisiana swamps during BioBlitz last weekend, but an exhibit in town reveals the deep roots of the naturalist tradition in New Orleans.