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Tag archives for illegal wildlife trade

For Africa’s Elephants, Bearing Witness Bears Fruit

By James Deutsch

Chelsea Clinton is back in Africa because she understands that the successful conservation projects in areas she toured in 2013 – including Tanzania’s Tarangire National Park and the Kazungula Landscape, comprising parts of Zambia, Botswana, Namibia, Zimbabwe and Angola – don’t have to be the exception. She and President Clinton, accompanying her on this trip, believe that with sufficient resources and political will, such efforts can be repeated across the continent where elephants, rhinos, and other threatened species continue to be poached.

Pangolin Prison – Part II

Warning: this article contains images that some viewers might find disturbing. – After iLCP Fellow Paul Hilton documented the bust of a massive pangolin poaching operation in Medan, Indonesia, he assists at the incineration of all of the 3000 to 4000 pangolins slaughtered by the poachers.

Pangolin Prison 

iLCP Fellow Paul Hilton documents the bust of a massive pangolin smuggling operation in Sumatra, finding over 5 tons of slaughtered pangolins, but also leading to the rescue and release of 96 of them.

Livelihoods, Jobs, and the Illegal Wildlife Trade

By John G. Robinson

The illegal wildlife trade is big business. Not including the illegal trade in timber, it exceeds $19 billion annually. The trade is heavily capitalized and is part of the same criminal networks that are involved in drugs, weapons and human trafficking. While the impacts on wildlife populations – including elephants, tigers, and fish species – are widely known, the effects on human livelihoods, community integrity, income-generating jobs, sustainable development, and national economies are equally pervasive.

Poachers of Pangolins

The pangolin is the world’s most highly-traded mammal, with more than a million being poached from the wild over the last decade, but most people are not aware such an animal even exists. iLCP Fellow Paul Hilton urges us to pay attention to the decimation of the pangolin, before it is too late.

Conservation between Hope and Despair

The last few months have been busy for team Panthera in Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan. On a hopeful note – repeat snow leopard camera trap surveys in the Alichur in the eastern Pamirs have shown a small yet promising increase in snow leopards using the protected conservancy grounds. More predator-proof corrals have been built in the eastern…

In Kenya, Justice Catches Up With Elephant Poacher

An elephant poacher in Kenya is finally behind bars, thanks to a local magistrate and coordination between the wildlife authority and two conservation partners. In late 2013, community game scouts undertaking an anti-poaching patrol near world-renowned Amboseli National Park in southern Kenya came across a fresh elephant carcass. Not surprisingly, the elephant’s two tusks were…

Industrial-Scale Tiger Farms: Feeding China’s Thirst for Luxury Tiger Products

Young, healthy tigers jump through rings of fire, sit upright on cue, clawing at the air, and perform other well-choreographed circus tricks. Enthusiastic crowds cheer. After the show, some pay extra to hold small, cuddly cubs. But those who visit these tiger attractions in China have no idea of the suffering behind the scenes or the dark commerce that keeps them afloat.

The Silent Roar on the Roof of the World: Saving Snow Leopards

The eastern Pamir plateau in Tajikistan, called the Bam-e Dunya (Roof of the World) at 13,000 feet and higher, is an unforgiving place, especially in winter. And yet, despite temperature plummeting to -50 Fahrenheit in the winter, people, mostly Kyrgyz herders, eke out a living in this harsh environment, tending to their yaks, sheep and…

Dying in a Living Room: The Illegal Live Cheetah Trade

Wildlife trafficking has become one of the major conservation issues of our time and the sinister illegal trade in cheetahs is increasingly coming to the attention of conservationists. Unlike leopards, the main trade in cheetahs is not a consequence of the desire for beautiful spotted skins to decorate the house, nor is it a response…

Pangolins Roll into the Wildlife Trafficking Spotlight

An unexpected newcomer has joined the world’s most iconic species — the elephant, rhino, and tiger — under the international wildlife trafficking crisis spotlight: Meet the pangolin. Pangolins are unmistakable in appearance — they are covered with scales comprised of keratin, and indeed, petting a pangolin feels like stroking a layer of warm thumbnails. There…

Illegal Tiger Trade: Why Tigers Are Walking Gold

In part two of a 12-part series, Sharon Guynup and Steve Winter investigate one of the most devastating threats facing the world’s last 3,000 wild tigers: poaching.

This Week in London: Uniting to End the Scourge of Illegal Wildlife Trafficking

The international trade in parts and products of wild animals is worth more than $150 billion per year. Yes, billions. International illegal wildlife trade is considered by some experts to be the fourth largest illegal trade in the world (after drugs, weapons, and human trafficking). It involves animals and plants used for collectibles, food, pets, ornaments, curios, leathers, medicines, and cosmetics. It includes tens of millions of wild mammals, reptiles, birds, fish, and other species.

Elephant Crisis: An International March, As Warning and Call to Action

Elephants have captured the imagination of individuals across the world. Majestic beings, they have enthralled even those who may never have enjoyed close contact with them. It’s this empathy that has led thousands of people worldwide today to join the International March for Elephants organized by iworry, a campaign by the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust, to sound the warning that the future survival of elephants is in serious jeopardy. By Daphne Sheldrick, founder of the conservation charity.

July 21, 2013: Swimming From Cuba to Florida, Developing Deep Sea Diving Suits, and More

This week, join us as we attempt to swim from Cuba to Florida and meet a surprisingly potent form of jellyfish, then we listen to glaciers as they melt and learn what they’re telling us, and we hear protest songs from an indigenous Australian country singer.