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Tag archives for Indigenous

Listening to the volcano: Nasa communities blend ancestral knowledge with contemporary seismology in Colombia

On Ricardo Mena’s first humanitarian mission with the United Nations in April 1994, the only way to fly over southwestern Colombia’s Valle del Cauca was by police helicopter. Mena had been assigned to track indigenous Nasa displaced by the Páez River earthquake, but an eager police officer kept leaning over to photograph the poppy fields…

Indonesia’s Indigenous Communities Use Ecotourism To Secure the Rights to their Land

From Chandra Kirana in Bogor, Indonesia. Six Indigenous communities have launched an ecotourism initiative that would show off their ancestral forests in a bid to develop alternate economic models that local government in Indonesia could embrace, moving away from extractive industries such as mining and palm oil plantations. The initiative, called GreenIndonesia, would ultimately help…

Under-the-Radar Environmental Stories for 2015: The Furtive Five

Between crazy weather, international events, and global agreements, 2014 was a year in which climate change took center stage. Whether it was a catastrophic drought in California, accelerated ice melting in Antarctica, or even record-breaking heat disrupting the Australian Open, the impacts of climate change are being felt around the world—and people are starting to…

The Peel River Watershed: The Endangered Wilderness of Canada’s Yukon

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic Voices blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text and photos by Peter Mather, Fellow at the International League of Conservation Photographers. From the front seat of our Cessna 172, the…

The Coral Triangle: Amazon of the Oceans

Home to over three quarters of the world’s coral species, The Coral Triangle is the underwater equivalent of the Amazon. It encompasses an area half the size of the United States and harbours more marine species than anywhere else on the planet. From Borneo down to the edge of the South Pacific, the Coral Triangle has some of the most breathtaking underwater landscapes, but the majority are buckling under the pressures of overfishing, resource extraction and climate change. Text and Photos by iLCP Fellow James Morgan.

Methane and the Transformation of an Indigenous Community in Colorado

This posting is an excerpt from a longer report to which I contributed for the Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development and published in May, 2014. The full report is available here. Amidst all the negativity one often reads about the predicament of indigenous communities worldwide, particularly with reference to extractive industries investments on…

A Bottom-Line Focus For Solving Mining Conflicts

The lure of precious metals and other natural resources has long been a source of conflict in Latin America, from the Andes to the Amazon and most everywhere else.  But new research has begun to put a price tag on this conflict, and investors have started to respond. When the lives and livelihoods of Indigenous…

January 12, 2014: Climbing Buildings, Hunting Poachers and More

Join host National Geographic Weekend host Boyd Matson and his guests as they climb the world’s tallest buildings, ski with the sport’s inventors, give new life to Christmas trees, seek sea life at the bottom of the ocean, discover the unicorn, protect rhinos by hunting for poachers, kayak blind through the Grand Canyon, prioritize protection plans for endangered species, and track the world’s underground water reserves.

September 29, 2013: Photographing Every Animal in Captivity, Saving Apes from Guerillas, and More

Join us this week, as we set a world record kayaking 151 miles in 24 hours, then build an Ark to help save all of the world’s animals, teach pandas to breed successfully, and finally, rekindle old friendships with indigenous people in Nepal after 45 years apart.

Employment and Indigenous Empowerment in Mining: Australia and South Africa

I recently supervised the Master’s degree thesis project of Richard W Roeder, a German lawyer and Rotary Peace Studies Scholar at the University of Queensland who sought to ask the following research question:  “How do Public Governance and Private Governance regarding the employment of Indigenous Australians / Historically Disadvantaged South Africans in the mining sector…

On the Alaskan Tundra: Picking & Preserving Berries for Winter Months

Blueberry picking is a meditative experience, but look out for bears!

Nome Sweet Home: Finding a Place to Live in Nome, Alaska

Our lodgings in Nome has a rich history… but no heat.

Tribal Festivals

As global monoculture erodes cultural diversity, the diversity of tribal festivals and rituals is a reminder that humans have different insights, different priorities, and choose other – successful – ways of living. For many tribes, life is lived through ritual. Rituals are held in honor of the lands that sustain tribal peoples and the spirits…

Flying Panama’s Underdogs

How do GPS units, cameras and chance encounters on the streets of Bozeman Montana help indigenous people trying to protect their land in Panama?

The Cheetah & The San Bushmen of Botswana

While traveling with Cheetah Conservation Botswana, I had the rare experience to meet the Nai Nai San Bushmen of the Central Kalahari. The name Nai Nai translates directly as “people of the bush” thus they consider themselves to be the true bushmen.  This small family group is one of many who travel through the area…