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Hair Bands and Giant Trousers: A Lesson in How Little I Know About Bees

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic Voices blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text and photos by Clay Bolt, Fellow at the International League of Conservation Photographers. www.claybolt.com / www.beautifulbees.org For months I have been…

October 5, 2014: Climbing Into Volcanoes, Swimming the Seven Seas and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend radio, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they climb into volcanos to look for bacteria, invent environmentally and academically friendly ways to make tea, create the largest marine reserves in the world, make tiny soft robots, swim the seven seas, survive an avalanche, eat ice cream in the name of conservation, and swim with Great white sharks.

Foodie Bees: Insects Head Downtown for Dinner

Foodies aren’t the only ones these days swarming cities in search of the best eats: Bees also prefer to eat in cities, new research shows.

7 Bug and Spider Myths Squashed

How many spiders do we really eat in a year? Can cockroaches survive nuclear winter? What’s the difference between venomous and poisonous?

Why Do Males Have Built-in Weapons?

The impressive array of male weaponry—from horns to antlers to claws—evolved from individual species’ combat styles, a new study says.

Ask Your Weird Animal Questions: “Stiletto” Snakes, Cat Purrs

Why does your cat purr? What’s a stiletto snake? Check out this week’s Ask Your Weird Animal Questions.

Geography in the News: Fire Ants, Surviving and Thriving

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM Fire Ants: Surviving and Thriving Summer is in full swing and an invasive pest is making life miserable for residents, visitors and native and domestic animals across the southern United States. Fire ants have an incredible ability to survive and geographically expand their territories…

The High-Flying Ant With a Bite Like a Bear Trap

There’s an invasive species conquering new territory in the southeastern United States. It has gnarly jaws, a formidable sting, and the ability to launch itself into the air like a bottle rocket. These insects are known as trap-jaw ants, and they could be heading to a backyard near you. Most trap-jaw ants belong to the…

Can Spider Venom Save the Honeybee?

A new pesticide based on the venom of a particular spider kills common agricultural pests but leaves honeybees unharmed, a new study says.

Wasp Bores Into Fruit With Metallic “Drill Bit”

The female fig wasp has a built-in power tool: An appendage that’s thinner than a human hair and tipped with zinc, a new study reveals.

May 11, 2014: Capturing the Spirit of Adventure, Saving Sea Turtles and More

Every week, embark with host Boyd Matson on an exploration of the latest discoveries and interviews with some of the most fascinating people on the planet, on National Geographic Weekend. Please check listings near you to find the best way to listen to National Geographic Weekend on radio, or listen below! Hour 1 – Adventurers who regularly push their limits of…

World’s First Female “Penis” Found, in Cave-Dwelling Bugs

Four new species of cave insects in Brazil have sex-reversed genitalia, a “completely astonishing” discovery, scientists say.

Ancient Daddy Longlegs Had Extra Set of Eyes

The 305-million-year-old fossil may reveal secrets about the evolution of spider eyes, new study says.

March 30, 2014: Skiing Everest, Mission Blue, Search for Michael Rockefeller, Violent Animal Reproduction, and More

Join radio host Boyd Matson every week for adventure, conservation and green science. This week his guests try to solve the mystery of the disappearance of Michael Rockefeller, figure out if Mother Nature is really trying to kill you, ski off the seven summits including Everest, look inside the city of Damascus during the Syrian War, dive into Mission Blue with Sylvia Earle, look at how much food we waste each year, take a walk on the surface of Mars, and find out what we should pack on a camping trip.

19 New Species of Speedy Praying Mantises Found

Scientists have found 19 new species of mantises that roam Central and South America—and named one of them after Al Gore, a new study says.