National Geographic

VOICES Voices Icon Ideas and Insight From Explorers

Menu

Tag archives for Madagascar

Mangrove deforestation in Madagascar: What are the options?

The last time you heard from us at Blue Ventures, my colleague Garth Cripps was talking about shark fishing on Madagascar’s west coast.  Here Dr. Trevor Jones, our Blue Carbon Science guru, talks about his favorite coastal ecosystem, mangrove forests, and some of the ways we’re looking to partner with communities for their conservation. Take…

The Circle of Life on the Eighth Continent

Cara Brook reflects on the amazing burdens and dynamics of life and death in Madagascar’s wilderness.

November 16, 2014: Speed Climb 3,000 Foot Walls, Meet the Darwin of NYC’s Rodent World and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they set a speed record on El Capitan, prosecute poaching kingpins, share survival tips for extreme weather, dig up clues on ancient tsunamis to study for future risk, hold our breath to survive a surfing disaster, call the Malagasy military for an airlift, understand the evolution of New York’s rats, and mourn the Sherpa guides and porters lost on Everest.

Rainforest Blessings and Curses in Rural Madagascar

The long nights in Madagascar give Cara Brook time to reflect on how different her world is from the one she’s visiting and studying.

Springtime and Possibility in Madagascar

Springtime in Madagascar is only just beginning as fall blankets the Northern Hemisphere. It’s a busy, trying, unique and rewarding time to study pathogens in bats!

My Fihavanana Malagasy: At Home on the Eighth Continent

Cara Brook is a disease ecologist from the Andrew Dobson Lab at Princeton, studying diseases that can leap from bats to humans. In the course of her work, she has earned a Malagasy family, which sparks her curiosity for the origins of humanity on Madagascar.

Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them (Mostly Madagascar!)

Cara Brook is a disease ecologist from the Andrew Dobson Lab at Princeton, studying diseases that can leap from bats to humans. Here she explores the incredible Ankarana Preserve, as well as theories on species distribution and evolution.

Science on the Edge of the World: Tales From Madagascar’s Sakalava Menabe

Cara Brook is a disease ecologist from the Andrew Dobson Lab at Princeton, studying diseases that can leap from bats to humans. Her work is well underway, and it involves a lot more than just tagging and indexing bats.

Back on the Far Side of the World…

Cara Brooke is a Disease Ecologist from the Andrew Dobson Lab at Princeton, studying diseases that can leap from bats to humans. She has just returned to Madagascar a second time and is preparing for another year of fieldwork.

Defending Madagascar’s Frogs From Invading Fungus

By Jonathan Kolby It all started as an idea one afternoon seven years ago.  Having recently learned about the devastating amphibian chytrid fungus (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, or Bd) that was spreading globally and causing irreparable damage to the world’s amphibian biodiversity, I felt there must be something more I could personally do to help save the…

Shark Fishers in Madagascar Sell Fins for Pennies

As a proud new contributor to the Ocean Views blog, I’ll be bringing you stories from myself and my colleagues at Blue Ventures about marine conservation in Madagascar and Belize. This first one comes from Garth Cripps, a senior conservation scientist with Blue Ventures in Madagascar. Here Garth tells us about a series of encounters…

February 2, 2014: Walking from Siberia to Australia, Prepping Putin’s $51 Billion Bash and More

This week, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they walk from Siberia to Australia, celebrate Putin’s $51 billion Olympic bash, get to the historic bottom of Groundhog Day, cycle 11,000 miles from Norway to South Africa, spend 200 days in a year deep inside of caves, dodge the bubonic plague in Madagascar, and search for the last of Africa’s glaciers.

NG Young Explorer Behind the Scenes: The Good, the Bad, and the Unforgettable

National Geographic Young Explorers Grantee Alizé Carrère is researching an innovative method of agricultural adaptation in the Malagasy highlands that has emerged in the face of severe deforestation. Known to locals as “lavaka”, literally meaning “hole”, they are massive erosional gullies that provide surprising agricultural and socio-economic benefits, turning a deforested landscape into one of…

Fieldwork – Or How To Still Explore The World À La Indiana Jones

National Geographic Young Explorer Alizé Carrère is researching an innovative method of agricultural adaptation in the Malagasy highlands that has emerged in the face of severe deforestation. Known to locals as “lavaka”, literally meaning “hole”, they are massive erosional gullies that provide surprising agricultural and socio-economic benefits, turning a deforested landscape into one of opportunity,…

Severe Erosion Reveals Earth’s Treasures

National Geographic Young Explorer Alizé Carrère is researching an innovative method of agricultural adaptation in the Malagasy highlands that has emerged in the face of severe deforestation. Known to locals as “lavaka”, literally meaning “hole”, they are massive erosional gullies that provide surprising agricultural and socio-economic benefits, turning a deforested landscape into one of opportunity,…