VOICES Voices Icon Ideas and Insight From Explorers

Menu

Tag archives for marine conservation

Can Congress Deliver Happy Days for Fish, Fishermen?

To give you a break from the onslaught of 2015 year-in-review stories, let’s test your memory of a bygone era. Can you pinpoint the year that: “Happy Days” was the most popular television show? A gallon of gas cost 59 cents? “Rocky” won the Oscar for best film? The U.S. Navy tested the Tomahawk cruise…

The mysterious life of Mister K: a seahorse life history study in Cambodia

Guest post by Delphine Duplain and Amick Haissoune, project coordinators at Marine Conservation Cambodia, in conjunction with Dr. Tse-Lynn Loh, postdoctoral research associate at Shedd Aquarium Once upon a time, there were some buoys marking the edges of our house reef off Koh Seh in Kep Province, Cambodia, thus protecting the reef from passing boats. Surprisingly,…

A coffin for cod? The downward spiral of the fish that built New England

When Mike Anderson arrived in Cape Cod in the 1960s as a young man with dreams of adventures at sea, many people shared the same warning: “You won’t get rich in the fishing business; it’s just a way of life.” But Anderson, undeterred, embraced that lifestyle, fishing his way through decades of long, sometimes treacherous…

Why Is Managing Fish in the World’s Oceans Like an Episode of ‘I Love Lucy’?

Fish scientist Jason Link says he often feels like he’s living the classic chocolate factory episode of the 1950s TV show “I Love Lucy,” in which Lucy and Ethel can’t wrap candies as fast as the conveyor belt spits them out. “It’s analogous to fisheries management,” says Link, whose mission at the National Oceanic and…

New Study Showed Spawning Frequency Regulates Species Population Networks on Coral Reefs

New research on tropical coral reef ecosystems showed that releasing larvae more often is beneficial for a species’ network. The study on reproductive strategies is critical to assess the conservation of coral reef ecosystems worldwide. Researchers from the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science used a computer model developed by…

Study of ‘Senior Citizen’ Marine Snails Uncovered How Nerve Cells Fail During Learning

A new research study on marine snails uncovered the first cells in the nervous system to fail during aging. The University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science researchers’ findings are important to better understanding the underlying mechanisms of age-related memory loss in humans. Scientists performed tail reflex experiments on the hatchery-reared…

Tiger Shark Sinks its Teeth into Scientific Study

What’s happening in this video? In this video, a tiger shark investigates and eventually bites an underwater hydrophone that our team set up in the Bahamas to study tiger shark movements. This is part of a larger collaborative research project underway on the behavior and ecology of tiger sharks in the subtropical Atlantic Ocean. How…

Going to the mat for fish and fishermen

On one side: fish. On the other side: fishermen. In the middle: Zeke Grader. For more than four decades, the California-based fishing advocate has worked to find common ground between taking care of the environment and looking out for the needs of family fishermen. Armed with passion and determination, the law school graduate and former…

New Tool To Monitor Harmful Bacteria at Beaches

An international team, led by researchers has developed a new, timelier method to identify harmful bacteria levels on recreational beaches. The new model provides beach managers with a better prediction tool to identify when closures are required to protect beachgoers from harmful contaminates in the water. “The development of this new model has allowed us,…

Threatened Corals Swap “Algae” Partners to Survive Warming Oceans

A new research study showed why threatened Caribbean star corals sometimes swap partners to help them recover from bleaching events. The findings are important to understand the fate of coral reefs as ocean waters warm due to climate change. The University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science research team placed colonies…

Tracking Fish Oil Supplements to the Source

Are fish oil supplements really improving our health but hurting our oceans? That’s one question New York Times bestselling author Paul Greenberg is exploring for his next book, due out next year, The Omega Principle: The Health of Our Hearts, the Strength of Our Minds, and the Survival of our Oceans All in One Little…

Fisherman Finds a Way to Help Sea Animals Avoid Needless Death on Hooks

Tim Palmer was the kind of kid who took apart anything his parents gave him and then tried to put it back together. Much of the time, he got it right. Palmer never grew out of that curiosity about how things work—or how they could be improved. So one night off the Florida coast in…

The Small Town Boy Who Charted a New Course for Our Oceans

As a North Carolina graduate student, Bill Hogarth remembers fishermen proudly hanging giant marlin high on the wharf at Morehead City so people could admire and photograph the prized catch. But after the crowds lost interest, it was Hogarth’s job to cut down the nearly half-ton behemoths and watch their lifeless bodies float out to…

What’s happened to all the striped bass?

Some people jump out of airplanes or go rock climbing for an exhilarating time. For me, it’s chasing striped bass—big, powerful, and beautiful. I always feel a rush of excitement as my fishing line goes screaming off the reel once a large bass takes my lure, knowing that while adult bass in the ocean typically…

Congress Needs to Think Big About Fish

When you buy a house, do you inspect only the roof? Of course not. You look at the whole structure: the foundation, insulation, plumbing, and many other aspects that indicate the overall condition of a home. Taking a look at the big picture is wise when buying a house—and equally wise when making many other…