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Tag archives for mexico

On Returning and Continuing On: The End of My Fulbright-National Geographic Grant

I’m writing this from a cafe in San Francisco, sipping on a coffee that I bought for the price of a nice breakfast in Mexico. I ordered the drink in English, a language which at least 75% of the people I’ve overheard talking on the street seem to speak. I can make convincing small talk…

The New Face of Government Housing in Mexico City’s Suburbs

  Though we’re entering into the season where this city seems to get rain every single afternoon, I’ve been running around to many corners of the city for the last several weeks, speaking to more people living in Mexico City’s suburbs, and photographing the surroundings. This post is a follow-up of sorts to my experience…

Why Fly in Mesoamerica?

Ivan and Bud talk about why LightHawk flies conservation missions in Mexico and Central America in the final installment of our Ride Into Birdland guest blog. Click here to read from the beginning. I.G. What is Lighthawk? L.S. Lighthawk is a group of volunteer pilots, some 220 volunteer pilots living across the United States, who…

The Contemporary City at its Limits: Santa Fe, Mexico City

Santa Fe, located about a 12-mile drive (or somewhat risky walk) from the center of Mexico City, is, depending on your perspective, the metropolitan area’s most modern district, or its most soulless. Set in the rolling hills west of the city, along the federal freeway to the nearby city of Toluca, it is tenuously connected…

After Flight with Capt. Bud

Photographer Ivan Gabaldón interviews volunteer pilot Bud Sittig in this second installment of Gabaldón’s guest blog from Ride Into Birdland. (Click here for the first installment of the series.) On the night of our second day I get together with Captain “Bud” to learn more about his experience as an aviator and the work he…

Fly Into Birdland

Guest post from Iván Gabaldón of Ride Into Birdland for Pronatural Peninsula de Yucatan. The sun is just beginning to rise but I feel none of its warmth as I walk towards the vintage Cessna on the wet tarmac of Merida’s airport. I’m about to embark on my first aerial photography mission for Pronatura Peninsula…

Explorations in Suburban Mexico City, a Picture Transect

It’s been a couple of weeks since I’ve been present on the blog, but while I’ve been away, I’ve had a great set of excursions into the edges of Mexico City. From semi-rural compounds in the hills of Tlalpan, to a hilltop site of traditional religious ceremonies in Ecatepec, to the former city dump Bordo…

Walking Towards Mexico’s Corporate Edge City

Santa Fe is Mexico City’s Edge City – a rapidly growing office park on the outskirts of an extant metropolitan area. Located along a major highway out of the city, the site (some 12 miles from the center) was once a landfill, and with significant investment from the city and federal governments, it was transformed into the…

Mexico’s Unknown Cities: Naucalpan and Ecatepec

Mexico City’s Distrito Federal is the nation’s largest urban administrative unit. Of the 22 million residents of the metro area, 8.8 million live in the D.F. If you were to ask most Mexicans what the country’s “second city,” the runner-up in terms of population, most would likely venture Monterrey, perhaps Puebla, or Guadalajara. While Guadalajara is…

Scenes from Neza: Mexico’s Self-Made City

Ciudad Nezahualcóyotl is the prototypical informal settlement of metropolitan Mexico City. Built just over the line from the Distrito Federal in the Estado de México, Neza—as it is commonly called—looms large in the imagination of the city. From its beginnings as an illegally developed, planned, and built settlement in the late forties, Neza has served…

March 8, 2015: Bee Stings, Tiger Farms, Deadly Sugarcane and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they survive moose and cold temperatures to win the Yukon Quest, live in the wilderness for 8 months with moth-eating bears, photograph bees, learn about Mayan achievements, investigate China’s tiger farms, understand Nicaragua’s sugarcane worker health crisis, study the sunset’s colors, myth-bust “clean coal”.

Tlatelolco and the Modernist Dream in Mexico City

Officially the Conjunto Urbano Presidente Adolfo López Mateos de Nonoalco Tlatelolco (*phew*), the district of Tlatelolco is today a fascinating vestige of mid-century Mexico’s modernist past, and—what I like even more—a vision of a future that could have been. As I continue to try to understand the current face of urbanization on Mexico City’s edges,…

Satellite Cities: The Early Suburbs of Mexico City

This week, continuing in my investigation of the geography of growth in Mexico City’s metropolitan area, and following my most recent exploration of the wealthier, more U.S.-styled segments of sprawl in the city, I made a trip out to Ciudad Satélite, one of the oldest, and most famous suburban developments in the region. Thanks to the…

Wealth and Sprawl in Mexico City

As I wrote before I arrived here, I grew up on an edge of Los Angeles—I could ride my bike down the hill to the park and the comic book store in the strip mall, and, with enough energy, I could ride up the nearby canyon and into the undeveloped hills. I hadn’t been reminded of that…

The Mangroves of Mexico – By Numbers.

Mangroves are trees that have evolved to survive in flooded coastal environments. A fragile web of life that generates valuable ecosystem services. Mexico is one of the countries with the most mangroves, but also occupies one of the first places in the rate of deforestation. Each year thousands of hectares are cleared and replaced by shrimp farms, agribusiness plantations, or mega tourism development. At current rates of deforestation, in 25 years about 50% of mangroves in Mexico will be lost. http://thenaturalnumbers.org/mangroves.html