VOICES Voices Icon Ideas and Insight From Explorers

Menu

Tag archives for mexico

The vulnerable vaquita: Immediate action needed to save critically endangered porpoise

Scientists find vaquita populations continue to plummet, calling for more research and greater protections.

Ancient Maya Arts Still Thrive in Chiapas

“The only resource we have had, and the most valuable, has been ourselves and the ideas of the collective, our rural-indigenous folk-wisdom,” say members of Taller Leñateros, an independent indigenous shop in Mexico.

Reserva Monte Mojino: Conservation on the Slopes of the Sierra Madre

A cactus flower blooming next to a lush fig tree, a desert tortoise resting beneath an elegant trogon perched in a mesquite: I first encountered these strange bedfellows when I visited the forest near Alamos in Sonora, Mexico, during the summer monsoon. It is here, along the slopes of the Sierra Madre Occidental, that one…

Borders, Walls, and the Future of Wildlife in a World of Barriers

There have always been natural obstacles to the movement of plants and animals: climate, mountain ranges, oceans, but the pace of change with these obstructions offers a chance to adapt and therefore often ignites the flames of natural diversity. Human-wrought barriers however, whether they are suburban roads or international border walls, tend to have the opposite effect: they are sudden, defy nature’s logic and though some species may see benefits, the overall impact erodes biological diversity.

Giant Underwater Cave Was Hiding Oldest Human Skeleton in the Americas

In a pitch black, 140-foot-deep underwater cave, three divers make a stunning 13,000-year-old discovery: the oldest complete human skeleton ever found in the Americas. In this video, see the ancient remains, venture through the remarkable deep-water chamber, and see how a skeleton belonging to a teenage girl from the last ice age lead scientists to a major revelation about the earliest Americans.

Celebrating Mexican Cuisine from Maya Forest to Chef’s Plate

By Rane Cortéz, Chief of Party, Mexico REDD+ Program, The Nature Conservancy “You said this was only nine kilometers?” I asked our guide as we emerged from the steamy Mayan jungle into the late afternoon sun. “Nine kilometers through the forest. Now we just have to ride back to the village—but it’s on the road,…

These Giant Manta Rays Just Want to Hang Out

How would you like to hop in the water with a giant sea creature that can grow almost 25 feet across and weigh up to two tons? For marine biologist and National Geographic grantee Joshua Stewart, it’s all in a day’s work. He has a soft spot for giant oceanic manta rays and is fighting to protect these gentle giants.

Tech-Savvy Teenage Girls Are the Camera-Trap Pros in This Mexican Community

Fernanda wouldn’t look out of place hanging out with a group of high-schoolers at a suburban mall in southern California, but instead she’s leading a group of thirty people into a remote cloud forest in southern Jalisco to look for large, predatory felines.

Optimizing Rapid Eradication Assessment

Biological invasions can happen quickly and the best response is a rapidly confirmed eradication. Models combining data on the population dynamics of the invasive species with a given level of monitoring effort allow managers to quantify the probability that eradication has successfully been achieved.

Mobula Munkiana – The Secret of El Barril

Clap, slap, clap clap clap! Mobula munkiana, also known as “Munk’s Devil Ray” explode out of the water around us like popcorn. Each, about the size of a coffee table in diameter, they leap out of the water and flap their wings as if they were able to take to the sky and fly like…

The Fight to Save the Vaquita

The vaquita, Spanish for little cow, is the world’s smallest porpoise and one of its most endangered sea mammals. Found only in the Gulf of California, the species is being driven to extinction by illegal gillnet fishing — caught in nets dropped for toatoba, an endangered fish whose swim bladders are thought to hold medicinal value in…

Fish Spawning Aggregations: an illusion of plenty

Spawning aggregations are massive gatherings of fish for breeding, a behavior shared by many species across the globe in many different habitats. They are predictable because they usually happen at the same place and at the same time each year, and humans have taken advantage of this to harvest large numbers of fish with minimal effort. But as harvesting keeps growing, fish populations keep diminishing.

Mesoamerican Race to Protect Parrotfish and the Reef

In a dramatic twist to the typical fishing tournament, this friendly competition among the four countries sharing the Mesoamerican reef (Belize, Guatemala, Honduras and Mexico) rewards international players who catch less fish and protect more coral reefs.

Life in the Gulf of California Hope Spot

The Gulf of California, a 700-mile narrow sea between Baja and mainland Mexico, is home to over 800 species of fish, 2000 invertebrates, as well as whales, dolphins, sea turtles and sea lions. The area includes 256,000 hectares of mangroves, 600,000 hectares of wetlands and 70 percent of Mexican fisheries. Simply put, this area is one of…

Fishy Parents Rejoice: Grades Rise, Few Fails on Caribbean’s Original Coral Reef Report Card

A report card from iLCP Partner Healthy Reefs for Healthy People, for the largest barrier reef in the Western Hemisphere – the Mesoamerican reef flanking the coasts of Mexico, Belize, Guatemala and Honduras – gives hope that it may earn this year’s award for “most improved,” or perhaps “happiest fish.”