National Geographic

VOICES Voices Icon Ideas and Insight From Explorers

Menu

Tag archives for monkeys

How Much for a Picture With the Monkey? The Real Cost Of Wildlife Tourism

I’ve been extremely fortunate to have spent the past seven months working and traveling in Southeast Asia with support from the National Geographic Society and the U.S. Fulbright program. While my research has brought me to Singapore and Gibraltar a number of times, I had not previously stayed long enough in either place to explore…

Macaques In The City: Lopburi Monkey Festival (Part Two)

Now for the main event – festival day! November 25th, 2013 (or the 4th Sunday of November annually) – the 25th annual Lopburi Monkey Festival commenced with all the simian fanfare one could imagine.  Of the 3000 monkeys that call Lopburi home, 200-300 live in the immediate vicinity of Phra Prang Sam Yot temple and…

Macaques In The City: Lopburi Monkey Festival (Part One)

Every year since 1989, 150km north of Bangkok, at the Khmer ruins of Phra Prang Sam Yot temple in Lopburi, Thailand, a few hundred macaques get to party like it’s… well… 1989 I suppose. Reverence of monkeys isn’t particularly new—in Hinduism, the monkey god Hanuman is an important figure who used his army of monkeys…

High Moon Over the Amazon: The Quest for the Monkeys of the Night

In “High Moon Over the Amazon”, a book about the dawn of her career as one of the world’s most distinguished primatologists, Patricia Chapple Wright recounts her pioneering research to study wild nocturnal monkeys in the Peruvian Amazon. It’s a page-turner of a yarn, in which Wright recalls stumbling around in total darkness, trying to follow the owl monkeys (Aotus) moving through the trees high in the canopy above her. The story is not only about how she came to discover the secrets of the world’s only night monkeys, but also the terrors of working in the jungle, including a face-to-face encounter with a jaguar, evading a large snake dangling from branches above her, and watching helplessly as a swarm of army ants swept into her encampment’s provision stores to devour supplies meant to support the scientists for months.

A Tale of Two Islands’ Monkeys: Tioman vs. Sentosa

Long-tailed macaques are also called crab-eating macaques, but here in Singapore it’s a rare occurrence to see them doing just that.  However, I recently had the great pleasure to see some honest-to-goodness crab-eating, crab-eating macaques.  Typically, I see the Singapore monkeys chowing down on lush forest fruits or local garbage cuisine.  On an excursion to…

Survivor Singapore: Return to Sisters’ Islands

  The legend of Sisters’ Island (also known as Pulau Subar Laut – Big Sister’s and Pulau Subar Darat – Little Sister’s) is quite poignant.  It tells of two pretty sisters, Minah and Linah.  Upon the deaths of their parents the sisters moved to their uncle’s village.  One day Linah was accosted by a group…

Monkeys Whisper, Study Says—But Why?

Cotton-top tamarins can choose to keep their voices down when a predator or otherwise unwelcome visitor is nearby, a new study says.

Lip-Smacking Primate Hints at Speech Evolution

A rare Ethiopian primate called the gelada makes sounds like people—giving insights into the evolution of human speech.

The Unsung Heroes of the Space Program

Iran may have launched a rhesus monkey into space this week, but it’s only the latest in a long line of unwitting participants in our exploration of outer space.

“Hercules” Monkeys Lift Stones to Crack Nuts

This holiday season, learn about a nutcracker of another sort—the bearded capuchin of Brazil.

Young Explorer Films Violent Monkey Takeover

While studying the maternal behavior of gelada monkey females, NG Young Explorer Shayna Liberman had a front row seat to witness violent, hours-long dominance battles between males, which she caught in stills and video.

Why ‘The Zookeeper’ Shouldn’t Listen to Animal Advice About Love

In the new film Zookeeper, Kevin James stars as a bumbling zookeeper who seeks relationship advice from his closest friends—the animals. Different animals at the zoo take turns giving their view on how to get the girl. But do these cinematic animals know what they’re talking about? We talked to biologists to get the truth about animal mating. Here’s a look at the animals’ advice in the movie, and whether or not it holds up:

Monkeys’ “Do Not Disturb” Sign

A group of mandrills at England’s Colcester Zoo have been observed covering their eyes, possibly an example of a cultural development.

A life in the trees is a longer one

By Ed Yong (via @Not Exactly Rocket Science @ScienceBlogs) In The Descent of Man, Darwin talked about the benefits of life among the treetops, citing the “power of quickly climbing trees, so as to escape from enemies”. Around 140 years later, these benefits have been confirmed by Milena Shattuck and Scott Williams from the University…

Half of all primates threatened with extinction

Nearly half the primate species are in danger of becoming extinct from destruction of tropical forests, illegal wildlife trade and commercial bush-meat hunting, conservationists said today. “Mankind’s closest living relatives–the world’s apes, monkeys, lemurs and other primates–are on the brink of extinction and in need of urgent conservation measures,” the conservationists said in a news statement…