National Geographic
Menu

Tag archives for Namibia

Top 25 Photographs from the Wilderness #21

“The question is not what you look at, but what you see.” Henry David Thoreau A good friend once told me that wildlife photography makes him sad. He explained that when he sees images of the wild creatures and unspoiled places his heart aches too deeply at the thought of what he perceives to be…

Seeking Digital Volunteers to Search & Protect Namibia’s Wildlife (Using Aerial Imagery from UAVs)

Patrick Meier is using UAVs, popularly called “drones”, to map out archaeological sites and aid humanitarian and environmental efforts. He partners with institutions around the globe to bring us amazing, interactive community projects and, of course, stunning aerial photos. New Update Here! UAVs are increasingly used in humanitarian response. We have thus added a new…

Face-to-Face Conservation

“The phone calls always seem to be on a Sunday and 1000 kilometres (600 miles) away from here” Florian Weise tells me. We’re standing next to a huge drum of diesel — “this is where the NGS Big Cats Initiative money went” he explains, filling up his pick-up for the long journey. Florian’s insights into…

Geography in the News: The Strangest Desert

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM The Strange Namib Desert of Africa Africa seems to always be in the news covering conflict and disease across the continent. Its wonderful physical diversity, however, provides a background that is often overlooked by the casual reader. The Namib Desert is just one of…

I Recognise the Cheetah by its Paw

Nothing quite excites the imagination than going for an early morning’s walk and seeing the paw prints of lions along the road from the previous night’s hunt. How many of them are they? How far away might they be? Who are they? Are they still hungry? Will I live to eat breakfast? Now, spend time…

Strength in Numbers: Defending the World’s Biggest Nest

Gavin Leighton is conducting experiments among weaver birds in Africa to try to understand the evolution of their amazing societies. Plummeting temperatures change the game of survival not just for weaver birds, but also all of the animals around them.

Family Strife

Mushara Waterhole, Etosha National Park, Namibia – Sunset began with a visit from Paula and Nadia and their fraction of the Athlete family. We saw them break the clearing from the southwest, and I rushed to get two of my volunteers out on their bunker observation rotation, but we were too late. They were coming in fast.

Ozzie on Fire Again

Mushara Waterhole, Etosha National Park, Namibia — Ozzie was on fire again Thursday, parting a sea of 14 bulls with his parade of musthy pomp until he reached his target—Mike. Mike is one of the largest bulls in our study population, and also one of the least aggressive. Why was he the focus of the young…

The Night Belonged to Ozzie

The world’s largest land creature stood on me last night—two giant feet over my head, putting me at a disturbing eye-level vantage with a dripping elephant phallus in the dark. It has occurred to me over the course of my research that an untimely end could happen to anyone studying these larger-than-life animals, but it’s not something I ever thought I’d live to tell about.

Time Passes at an Elephant’s Pace

Time passes at an elephant’s pace here at Mushara waterhole in the northeast corner of Etosha National Park, Namibia. The mornings are slow to materialize, a few solitary bulls drifting in like a lazy late morning gust from the northeast and then later from the southwest, each gliding through on non-overlapping paths. By early afternoon…

Okavango Delta Voted 1,000th UNESCO World Heritage Site!

Botswana’s Okavango Delta was voted in as the planet’s 1,000th UNESCO World Heritage Site today. Our project partner Dr Karen Ross and the Minister for Environment Tshekedi Khama were present at the announcement and are celebrating this momentous achievement in Doha.Here is the official UNESCO press release: http://whc.unesco.org/en/news/1159 Please share this news with as many…

UNESCO World Heritage Committee Vote On Okavango Delta Today!

Please post your comments in support of UNESCO World Heritage Listing for Botswana’s Okavango Delta below this blog! Here is a message from our Okavango Wilderness Project partner, Dr Karen Ross (African Wildlife Foundation/Wilderness Foundation/ Deustche Umwelthilfe), currently in Doha (Qatar) with the Botswana delegation for today’s vote: The big moment for the Okavango Delta has…

Hundreds of Cases of Conflict Between Farmers and Predators Defused in Namibia

In May 2014, a leopard trapped on a commercial livestock ranch in central Namibia became N/a’an ku sê’s 500th big predator conflict case. The vast majority of these animals (over 400) have been released immediately to keep contributing to the wild gene pool. In other situations, rehabilitation of an orphaned or conflict predator may be required. Lethal control is only necessary under rare circumstances and, although individual predators can cause significant economic damage, most landowners seek alternative solutions. National Geographic Big Cats Initiative Grantee Florian J Weise reports.

Sold Up The River? Hydro Power Threat Re-Opens Debate

Experts agree that the Popa Falls Hydro Power Project on the Okavango River in Namibia will a catastrophic impact on Africa’s soon-to-be newest UNESCO World Heritage Site, Botswana’s Okavango Delta, the world’s largest, wildest inland delta. Namibia is signatory to the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands (1971). This intergovernmental treaty provides for national action and international co-operation in…

Into The Okavango: Unique View Into 2013 Okavango Expedition

In September 2013, we embarked on our most challenging crossing of the Okavango Delta… The research data set we achieved over 15 days and 338km using a bespoke Android App was the most comprehensive ever and was shared in real-time via an open API and up-to-date satellite image. This 10-minute video documents an impossible expedition across dry,…