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Tag archives for National Park Service

Finding Your Passion in the National Parks

For as big and wild as the parks are, we have a tendency to put them into a very tiny box, thinking they’re just for summer road trips and photo journeys. It’s good to let them out.

National Geographic to Join National Park Service for Ten More BioBlitzes?

“I know that there was a commitment to do ten BioBlitzes, but what if we say that we want to do ten more,” National Geographic President and CEO Gary Knell said at the official launch of the Golden Gate Parks BioBlitz in San Francisco today.

Golden Gate BioBlitz: Lots of Nature to Explore

Distinguished botanist Peter Raven wishes he could participate personally in this Golden Gate BioBlitz, “because I grew up in San Francisco and became fascinated with nature – first mainly insects, then plants – in the City and around the Bay Area, from the 1940s onward. 


There is no area more fascinating in its biology, with many differences in relatively small geographical areas.”

Geography in the News: America’s Hiking Trails

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM Three National Scenic Hiking Trails In the fall of each year, many long-distance hikers are finishing up their hikes for the year as winter approaches, while others are making plans to begin their odesseys the following spring. While many yearn to attempt long-distance hikes,…

Great ‘Bayou Diversity’ Revealed by Jean Lafitte BioBlitz

Part scientific endeavor, part festival and part outdoor classroom, the BioBlitz hosted last week by the U.S. National Park Service and the National Geographic Society in Louisiana’s Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve yielded hundreds of observations, including the discovery of a rare Louisiana milk snake not previously recorded in the park. “This is the first time anyone has done this level of work on a bottomland, hardwood, freshwater system like this,” said Victoria Bayless, curator at the Louisiana State Arthropod Museum.

BioBlitz 2013: What an Explorer Gets Excited About

Photographer and lizard expert Neil Losin sets the stage for this year’s BioBlitz, a 24-hour exploration of the wilderness outside of New Orleans.

BioBlitz Raises Stewards of the Environment

The annual BioBlitz hosted by the National Park Service and the National Geographic Society is underwritten in part by the Harold M. and Adeline S. Morrison Family Foundation, a private grant-making philanthropy based in Chicago. Every year for five years the Morrison Family Foundation helps make the event possible. And every year the foundation’s executive director, Lois Morrison, participates in the BioBlitz with her husband Justin Daab and their daughters Josephine and Addie Daab.

News Watch interviewed Lois Morrison about her passion for both nature and education, and why she sees the BioBlitz as a special opportunity to reinforce our connection with the natural world.

September 16, 2012: Earth’s Earliest Mummies in Peru, Glacial Lakes on Mountaintops, and More

This week on “National Geographic Weekend,” join host Boyd Matson as we dodge cannibals in Indonesia, dodge polar bears while digging up dinosaur bones, educate the country’s future leaders, laugh along with hyenas in South Africa, climb mountains to save people living under glacial lakes, fight over the Ganges’ erosion in India, explore Peru’s national forests for new species, and photograph all of the units of America’s National Park System.

Goodbye to “Primitive America”: An Interview With Jon Jarvis

National Park Service director Jon Jarvis came to Rocky Mountain National Park this weekend to join in the BioBlitz. But he also came to release a report, prepared at his request by a committee of scientists, that outlines a new strategy for the Park Service as it approaches its centennial in 2016. Called Revisiting Leopold, the report is modeled on a 1963 report drafted by ecologist A. Starker Leopold. The Leopold Report became a lodestar for a generation of ecologically minded rangers, including Jarvis—but Jarvis says it no longer fits the world we live in.

Salmon Re-enter Olympic National Park River Thanks to Elwha Dam Removal

  Updated August 28, 2012 at 11 am The National Park Service reported this week that adult Chinook (king) salmon have been seen in the Elwha River in Olympic National Park, less than five months after removal began on the Elwha Dam. According to the Park Service, the fish are the first of their kind…

U.S. Adds 26,000 Acres to Petrified Forest Park

America’s best idea just got better, with the announcement today of an addition of some 40 square miles of fossil-rich lands to the U.S. Petrified Forest National Park (PFNP).

Photo Camp Flotilla Braves Serious Swell

National Geographic Photo Camp students at the Biscayne BioBlitz caught midnight parrotfish and gray triggerfish on an underwater shoot this afternoon before the high swell forced them to retreat to the relative safety (if not so much comfort) of their wave-pitched boat. “We were 12 miles from Convoy Point,” said colleague Susan Poulton, “five miles…

Red-Shouldered Hawk Gets Back to Nature

Lloyd Brown with Wildlife Rescue of Dade County frees a red-shouldered hawk to initiate the 24-hour species inventory at the National Geographic-National Park Service Biscayne BioBlitz. “The bird was brought to us in late February with what appeared to be a head injury that had caused brain trauma,” said Brown. “For several weeks it couldn’t…

2010 BioBlitz: Scientists, Teachers Needed!

Though it’s hard to believe here in D.C.—where we’ve still got more snow piled on most street corners than they’ve got on the runs at Whistler Mountain—in just a few short months many of my NG colleagues and I will head down to balmy Miami and Biscayne National Park for the fourth annual National Geographic-National…