National Geographic

VOICES Voices Icon Ideas and Insight From Explorers

Menu

Tag archives for Native Americans

Ecological Restoration of an Indigenous Community on the US-Canadian Border

Environmental justice concerns in Native communities across the Americas have been a source of continuing social conflict. Addressing the injustices of the past and rebuilding trust between companies, governments and communities remains a challenge. In this guest article, Kim McRae, a doctoral candidate at the University of Vermont with twenty years of community advocacy experience…

Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK): An Interview With Dr. Michael Hutchins

The following interview is my 12th in a series with my esteemed colleague Dr. Michael Hutchins. Michael recently joined the American Bird Conservancy, as the organization’s National Bird Smart Wind Campaign Coordinator. The distinguished ecologist has agreed to answer my questions about indigenous knowledge and the impact of such informational resources on the management of…

Honoring an American Icon with National Bison Day

On October 30, 2013, the U.S. Senate passed, by unanimous consent, a resolution officially designating November 2, 2013, as National Bison Day. The resolution earned the bipartisan support of 25 Senators – representing a quarter of the U.S. Senate. In passing the resolution, Democratic and Republican leaders have teamed up with close to 50 diverse groups in an initiative called the Vote Bison Coalition. The group represents bison producers, Native Americans, conservationists, educational institutions, recreationists, zoological institutions, health organizations, and businesses.

Geography in the News: The Long Trail of Tears

Researched and written by Kelly Gregg and edited by Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM THE CHEROKEES’ TRAIL OF TEARS A few people each summer seek to follow some of the many famous trails that crisscross the United States in memory of epic journeys of the original travelers. These include the…

Not Your Ordinary Home for Birds

Federal law makes it illegal for anyone to possess any part of a bald or golden eagle. Many Native Americans, however, use eagle feathers in their religious rituals. The Fish and Wildlife Service has granted permits to a small number of tribes, allowing them to run their own eagle aviaries. These aviaries, like the one run by the Iowa Tribe outside Oklahoma City, not only take care of many injured birds, but also provide feathers for those tribal members who need them.

Celebrating the Historic Ties of Native Americans to the Bison

Bison numbered over 30 million at the time of the United States’ founding, but that number dwindled to a mere 1,000 with the westward expansion of the United States. The American Bison Society, founded at the Bronx Zoo with the support of President Theodore Roosevelt, helped to restore bison numbers with animals transported west by rail from the Bronx. In the next century, bison numbers rebounded to nearly half a million.

Photography and Nature: Camille Seaman at TED 2013

Camille Seaman interrupts the stream of high-tech wizardry of the conference with a rich vision of nature, born from her Shinnecock heritage.

Geography in the News: Demise of the Maya

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Appalachian State University  DID CLIMATE CHANGE DESTROY THE MAYA? A recent article in the journal Science sheds new light on the collapse of the ancient Maya civilization. Scientists have argued for decades over what caused the Maya culture to disappear. The new study points to large-scale climate change…

Bringing North American Vikings Back to Life

From Vikings in Virginia(?) to the musical power of heavy metal, filmmaker Tony Stone helps flesh out the adventures of the Norse in America, six hundred years before the “first Thanksgiving.”

National Bison Day Celebrates a Nutritious Meat Alternative Driving Rural Economies

National Bison Day is one of the signature components of legislation now working its way through the United States Congress. At a time of deep partisan gridlock, the National Bison Legacy Act, which would make the bison our National Mammal, boasts broad support among both Democrats and Republicans. The bill has 18 sponsors in the Senate and 7 in the House, split about evenly by party.

Top Predator on the Plains: Wolf, Bear or Human?

Looking back in time, who was the top predator of the American prairie ecosystem? Wolves, grizzly bears… humans? As I continue my research of historic wildlife populations in northeastern Montana (read my first post here), it is important to consider how changes in human populations were affecting the ecology of this area. There was a…

August 5, 2012: Speed Scaling El Capitan, Teaching Women to Film in Afghanistan, and More

This week on “National Geographic Weekend,” join host Boyd Matson as we set a speed record on Yellowstone’s El Capitan, help Native North Americans rediscover their culture and tell their own stories, save physics with LSD, survey the wreckage of Japan’s tsunami on Washington’s coast, walk the length of the Andes, start a revolution in the Middle East by using photography, speak the language of London’s east side, and find America’s best beaches.

Native American Exhibit Opens in Italy

Indicating just how richly layered the history of human culture is, a new exhibit of Native American culture has opened up, not in some midwestern U.S. metropolis, but in the small medieval Italian city of Pinerolo, near the border with France. The creators reveal their vision for the exhibit.

Indigenous People Sound the Alarm on Climate Change

The air in the auditorium smelled faintly of burnt herbs. Josefina Lema Aguilar, a Kichwa elder from the mountains of Ecuador, lit a tiny sacred fire to bless last week’s conference on “Seeking Balance: Indigenous Knowledge, Western Science and Climate Change.” Dressed in traditional garb from the Andes, Aguilar gave the event’s opening prayer at…

The Beauty and Meaning of an Ancient Art Form

As indigenous filmmakers and artists from around the world gather for the 2011 All Roads Film Festival, a Native American potter invites you to discover the ancient techniques, rich symbolism, and deep spirituality of her art form.