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Tag archives for Native Americans

Writer James Welch: A Singular Voice From the Native American Renaissance

Today’s Google doodle celebrates a man whose work helped shape the Native American Renaissance and can still help develop cross-cultural communication in the U.S. and elsewhere.

Giant Underwater Cave Was Hiding Oldest Human Skeleton in the Americas

In a pitch black, 140-foot-deep underwater cave, three divers make a stunning 13,000-year-old discovery: the oldest complete human skeleton ever found in the Americas. In this video, see the ancient remains, venture through the remarkable deep-water chamber, and see how a skeleton belonging to a teenage girl from the last ice age lead scientists to a major revelation about the earliest Americans.

16 Voices From Standing Rock

“Our hearts pulled us this way, because the next battle after losing our land is truly the fight for water.”–Shirley Romero Otero quoted in the New York Times

Standing With Standing Rock and the Right to Clean Water

The Native Americans protesting pipeline construction under the Missouri River care—and shouldn’t we all.

Red, White, and Bison: This Iconic Animal Should be Named the National Mammal of the United States

This weekend, Americans will spend the 4th of July thinking of the things that make the United States great. Of course, that means independence and freedom, and probably barbecues and fireworks as well. But another of those quintessentially great things about America is the bison, an animal that has for too long gone unrecognized as the national icon that it is.

Ecological Restoration of an Indigenous Community on the US-Canadian Border

Environmental justice concerns in Native communities across the Americas have been a source of continuing social conflict. Addressing the injustices of the past and rebuilding trust between companies, governments and communities remains a challenge. In this guest article, Kim McRae, a doctoral candidate at the University of Vermont with twenty years of community advocacy experience…

Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK): An Interview With Dr. Michael Hutchins

The following interview is my 12th in a series with my esteemed colleague Dr. Michael Hutchins. Michael recently joined the American Bird Conservancy, as the organization’s National Bird Smart Wind Campaign Coordinator. The distinguished ecologist has agreed to answer my questions about indigenous knowledge and the impact of such informational resources on the management of…

Honoring an American Icon with National Bison Day

On October 30, 2013, the U.S. Senate passed, by unanimous consent, a resolution officially designating November 2, 2013, as National Bison Day. The resolution earned the bipartisan support of 25 Senators – representing a quarter of the U.S. Senate. In passing the resolution, Democratic and Republican leaders have teamed up with close to 50 diverse groups in an initiative called the Vote Bison Coalition. The group represents bison producers, Native Americans, conservationists, educational institutions, recreationists, zoological institutions, health organizations, and businesses.

Geography in the News: The Long Trail of Tears

Researched and written by Kelly Gregg and edited by Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM THE CHEROKEES’ TRAIL OF TEARS A few people each summer seek to follow some of the many famous trails that crisscross the United States in memory of epic journeys of the original travelers. These include the…

Not Your Ordinary Home for Birds

Federal law makes it illegal for anyone to possess any part of a bald or golden eagle. Many Native Americans, however, use eagle feathers in their religious rituals. The Fish and Wildlife Service has granted permits to a small number of tribes, allowing them to run their own eagle aviaries. These aviaries, like the one run by the Iowa Tribe outside Oklahoma City, not only take care of many injured birds, but also provide feathers for those tribal members who need them.

Celebrating the Historic Ties of Native Americans to the Bison

Bison numbered over 30 million at the time of the United States’ founding, but that number dwindled to a mere 1,000 with the westward expansion of the United States. The American Bison Society, founded at the Bronx Zoo with the support of President Theodore Roosevelt, helped to restore bison numbers with animals transported west by rail from the Bronx. In the next century, bison numbers rebounded to nearly half a million.

Photography and Nature: Camille Seaman at TED 2013

Camille Seaman interrupts the stream of high-tech wizardry of the conference with a rich vision of nature, born from her Shinnecock heritage.

Geography in the News: Demise of the Maya

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Appalachian State University  DID CLIMATE CHANGE DESTROY THE MAYA? A recent article in the journal Science sheds new light on the collapse of the ancient Maya civilization. Scientists have argued for decades over what caused the Maya culture to disappear. The new study points to large-scale climate change…

Bringing North American Vikings Back to Life

From Vikings in Virginia(?) to the musical power of heavy metal, filmmaker Tony Stone helps flesh out the adventures of the Norse in America, six hundred years before the “first Thanksgiving.”

National Bison Day Celebrates a Nutritious Meat Alternative Driving Rural Economies

National Bison Day is one of the signature components of legislation now working its way through the United States Congress. At a time of deep partisan gridlock, the National Bison Legacy Act, which would make the bison our National Mammal, boasts broad support among both Democrats and Republicans. The bill has 18 sponsors in the Senate and 7 in the House, split about evenly by party.