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Tag archives for Nepal

Mapping Nepal’s Devastation using a Drone

This post is the latest in the Drones and Small Unmanned Aerial Systems Special Series, which profiles interesting information, thoughts and research into using  drones, UAVs or remotely piloted vehicles for journalism and photography, that Kike learns about during his travels.   Using aerial footage taken by Kishor Rana with a drone that was not intended for mapping, Matthew Schroyer of the Professional…

Women Lead on Conservation in Nepal

“Women do most of the work in rural communities, they are the ones collecting firewood or fodder from the forests or fetching water from the faraway spring. Given how connected women are to nature, they are the most knowledgeable about natural resources and their connection to better livelihoods. Communities without empowered women are missing the backbone that strengthens them and helps them climb out of poverty.”

Bouncing Back: Nepal’s Tigers Survive Civil Turmoil

By Joseph Allchin

Dhaka, Bangladesh–For years the Himalayan nation of Nepal lacked a functional government. Years of war and subsequent reorientation of the state, left vulnerable the nation’s rich fauna and in particular its tigers to the rampant poaching that has decimated wildlife populations across Asia. While Nepal’s politicians bickered, fears rose for its iconic tiger, one of its most majestic animals. But now Nepal’s big cat may be on the rebound.

Geography in the News: China’s Fast Train to Tibet

  By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM China’s Ultimate Tourist Adventure In the summer of 2006, the Tibet’s “rooftop of the world” became more accessible with the opening of a new fast train connecting China with Tibet. Over the previous 50 years, China had envisioned a 1,233-mile (1,972-km) railroad route…

Weaving Together the Traditions of the Lowa Women in Nepal

In this Genographic Legacy Fund grantee profile, Chhing Lhomi describes her efforts to keep the ancient skills and culture of cloth making alive in her community.

September 29, 2013: Photographing Every Animal in Captivity, Saving Apes from Guerillas, and More

Join us this week, as we set a world record kayaking 151 miles in 24 hours, then build an Ark to help save all of the world’s animals, teach pandas to breed successfully, and finally, rekindle old friendships with indigenous people in Nepal after 45 years apart.

Asia: 10 lessons learned with the heart of a photographer

My mind races. It is five AM and I have not fallen asleep. I am awake after traveling from Bangkok to Tokyo, and from Tokyo to New York. It has been weeks that I have been touring Asia, with many lessons learned. Happy to report there have been no mishaps in any of the expeditions so far.…

Nairobi entrepreneur prepares to become first Kenyan climber to summit Mount Everest

Next spring, a 39-year-old climber from Nairobi hopes to become the first Kenyan man to summit Mount Everest – a feat requiring tremendous endurance, strength and determination. Steve Obbayi, a tech entrepreneur who taught himself how to write software and was a former high-school rugby star, plans to push himself to the limit when he…

Counting the Tigers That You Cannot See

Pollsters say tigers are the most popular animal species on this planet. Unfortunately, they are also among the most threatened. Wildlife biologists like me struggle to monitor the fate of surviving tiger populations.

Dreams of the World: Sarangi Player from Pokhara (Nepal)

This post is the latest in the series Dreams of the World, which profiles interesting people we meet during our travels. “My dream is to continue playing the Sarangi. I belong to the Gandharwa , a musician cast. Both my mother and father played the same instrument, a four-stringed violin-like instrument.  About 300 years ago my cast, the Gandharwa , delivered…

China’s Wolong Nature Reserve has Giant Pandas, but India’s Chambal Wildlife Sanctuary has Gharials & Gangetic Dolphins

As humans continue to encroach on waterways and wild lands and develop them to the extent they can, some species may vanish with or without our attempts to conserve them. With that said, we continue to fail at keeping illegal poachers at bay;  we continue to reproduce exponentially; we fail to reduce our carbon footprint;…

Human Pee Added to Compost Boosts Crops

People have been using manure as fertilizer for millennia. But scientists now believe they can turn human urine into liquid gold—as composting material.

Explorers’ Adventure in the Mustang Caves

Three modern day explorers relate their adventure tackling a rare challenge: scaling huge cliffs to examine human remains dating back centuries.

Nepal’s Mountain Villages Tap the Power of “Eternal Snows” With Micro-hydro

  Nepal’s soaring, snowy mountain peaks are a source of awe. They’re also a source of clean, life-altering power to the people who live in their shadows. The small Himalayan nation is promoting micro-hydro plants at the village level to produce renewable electricity, and green jobs, for citizens living far off the country’s limited power…

A New Lake, Renewable Energy, and Cultural Preservation at the Top of the World

Three National Geographic explorers team up for a unique expedition to a region at the crossroads of human survival and changing climate.