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Tag archives for North America

Photos: 10 Years After Reintroduction, Bison Counters Take to the Skies

Ten years ago we brought bison back to Sun Prairie after a 120-year absence, starting with just 16 animals. To count them now we have to take to the skies.

The West Coast Sardine Fishery is Closed: Not Because You Eat Sardines, but Because You Don’t

By Maria Finn As a food and lifestyle writer and someone who works in the seafood industry, I’ve long encouraged people to eat the little fish, particularly sardines, herring, anchovies and other small “forage” fish that are plentiful and local to California. This summer, the Pacific Fishery Management Council closed West Coast sardine fishing due…

Salamanders Are Pretty Awesome…But They may Be in big Trouble

By Doug Parsons, North America Policy Director, Society for Conservation Biology

On recent visit with my two young sons to the National Zoo here in Washington, D.C., I pleaded with them to make a quick detour to look at the pandas. My 11-year-old scoffed, and made a beeline for the Blink and you Miss It exhibit for the Japanese giant salamanders. Slimy, small and cold-blooded as they are, salamanders don’t always evoke the same “warm and fuzzy” response from many zoo-goers as the larger and more charismatic mammal species.

It’s Not Always Pretty – Restoring Native Prairie After the Plow

As the prairie prepares for winter slumber, Ellen Anderson is ramping up her efforts in time for spring. There’s a farmer to hire, a seed mix to order, and lots of paperwork to complete while snow starts to fall outside her home on American Prairie Reserve. 

Winter Road Salt – the Next Acid Rain? – May Threaten Adirondack “Queen of American Lakes”

Tendrils of fog curl above the waters of the Queen of American Lakes, as Lake George in New York’s Adirondack Mountains is known.  Biting winds gusted out of the northwest yesterday, and an early snow is forecast for tomorrow.  But for this one afternoon in late fall, cold winds fetching across slate-gray waves have gone…

Oysters in the Chesapeake Bay: When Partnerships Work

By Bob Vanasse Too often, environmental groups, regulators and fishermen find themselves cast in antagonistic roles on marine issues. Prolonged legal and regulatory battles frequently top headlines, while successful conservation partnerships go unheralded. The Chesapeake Bay, long plagued by problems like pollution and runoff, is benefitting from one such partnership. Regional fishermen, government agencies and environmental…

PHOTOS: 5 Animals That Outsmart Winter on the Northern Plains

While parts of the U.S. bundle up for extreme winter weather, the animals on American Prairie Reserve (APR) have enjoyed several warm weeks in January. Since my last trip to the Reserve earlier this month, our staff and volunteer adventure scientists have spotted bison, mule deer, and large groups of pronghorn moving with ease across the…

In Praise of Silence

In the past twelve years, I’ve made many winter trips to this area of the American Prairie Reserve and every time, when the wind calms, I’m still caught off guard by the lack of sound, any sound, for miles.

Carbon Markets Show Glimmers of Recovery in 2014

A year after the launch of its cap-and-trade program, California formally linked its emissions trading scheme with Quebec’s—enabling carbon allowances and offset credits to be exchanged between participants in the two jurisdictions. The linkage, which marks the first agreement in North America that allows for the trading of greenhouse gas emissions across borders, is designed to escalate…

Geography in the News: Wolf Controversies

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM Who’s Crying, “Wolf?” Wolves remain one of the American West’s most controversial species. Hardly a week goes by without a newspaper article describing conflicting issues about wolves across the West. Any discussion of the management of wolf populations and geographic ranges brings criticism from…

How to Put a Camera on a 1,000-Pound Bison

A team with National Geographic’s Crittercam recently installed two cameras on American bison for the first time—find out how they did it.

The Mystery of the Migrating Fishes: Swimming the Gauntlet to Green Bay

  Dr. Solomon David, Postdoctoral Research Associate Daniel P. Haerther Center for Conservation & Research, Shedd Aquarium Center for Limnology, University of Wisconsin-Madison The ice and snow of early spring in northern Wisconsin had come and gone. Also departing with the frigid weather were the adult northern pike our team had been tracking as the fish…

Horseshoe Crab #2859

Today, during an early morning walk along Morse Beach, near Sandy Point Bird Sanctuary in West Haven, I noticed many dead horseshoe crab on the sand. One of them had a tag, referring to #2859 and a phone number to report the find.   Back to the office, I learnt that the Maryland Fishery Resources Office has…

Baja’s Cabo Pulmo by Air – Pilot’s Log Day 2

In 1980, pilot Will Worthington fell in love with the wild side of Baja California. On a recent a 10-day aerial expedition, he found change on the horizon. This is the second in a series of posts he wrote about his adventure.

Big Things Come from Small Beginnings: The Mystery of the Sick Sea Lions

  On a cold, foggy morning along the Malibu coast, a small brown lump emerges from the sea and waddles ashore. I spot it from 100 yards away, but already my dog, Cooper, is at a full run toward the baby sea lion. I scream at him to stop, but it’s too late: The thin,…