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First Rules for Arctic Drilling Released

The U.S. Department of the Interior unveiled the first draft rules for offshore oil and gas exploration in the Arctic. The rules would require energy companies to clear a number of safety hurdles before being approved for drilling. “The Arctic has substantial oil and gas potential, and the U.S. has a longstanding interest in the…

Using Science to Empower Communities and Improve Marine Protected Areas in East Africa

By Jennifer O’Leary and Arthur Tuda When you think about East Africa, probably the first images that emerge are of large terrestrial animals like elephants and lions. Many people don’t know that East Africa has vibrant marine fishing communities and hundreds of miles of coral reefs. In a typical morning, you watch the sun rise…

Race for Water Odyssey against Plastic Pollution – The Countdown Begins

Less than one month from the big launch, the R4WO teams are putting the final touches on the expedition’s preparations. Technical details are adjusted, and bonds between team members grow stronger through training sessions in Lorient (France). Everything falls into place under optimal conditions before the trip to Bordeaux, R4WO’s first stop.   Final Tests:…

Fair Trade Writes New Chapter In Story of Tuna

  Tuna is the second most popular seafood in the United States, yet for most Americans, it’s a non-descript protein puck that inevitably gets mixed with mayonnaise and celery. Maybe the tuna in that can came from the Philippines, or Micronesia? Perhaps it was caught by a Japanese vessel and transferred to a processing plant…

Searching for the Fish That Built the Beach

Bumphead parrotfish are few and far between now, but their coral-chomping ancestors helped build the very beaches we sit on today.

Fluorescent Corals

This post is the last in the Click! Click! Click! Series which profiles interesting photographic moments that Kike captures during his travels.  This photograph shows the process known as fluorescence. Some organisms bioluminescent, like corals that absorb one color and emit another. This outgoing light is of a longer wavelength than the incoming. One form of energy is converted into another. If you like this…

Food Species Top the Latest Additions to The IUCN Red List

The IUCN World Parks Congress in Sydney, Australia saw the release of the latest update to The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species™ in front of a global audience of protected area professionals, conservationists, government representatives, and business leaders. These leaders consistently agreed that survival of many species depends on the conscious interaction between our…

Climate Change Risks, Impacts Focus of Reports

The United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) released its Fifth Assessment Synthesis Report warning that greenhouse gas levels are at the highest they have been in 800,000 years. “We have little time before the window of opportunity to stay within the 2C of warming closes,” said IPCC chairman Rajendra Pachauri. “To keep a…

October 12, 2014: Fighting South Pole Frostbite, Bathing Elephants and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend radio, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they survive frostbite on the frozen continent, explore Haiti’s marine culture, bathe an elephant, bobsled with British champions, dance with Birds of Paradise, learn the Secrets of the National Parks, and discover what has been hiding in Vietnam’s jungles.

Studies Focus on Warming of Oceans

Oceans absorb carbon dioxide and 90 percent of the heat caused by human activity—making their warming a critical topic for climate research. Two new studies—one on the upper oceans and one on deeper ocean depths—share findings about climate change’s effect on these water bodies. The first study, in the journal Nature Climate Change, provides the first estimate of…

Got an idea to protect our oceans? Here is $10k to make it happen.

In recent years, there has been a growing global understanding of the importance in establishing marine protected areas (MPA) in our oceans. These sanctuaries serve a fundamental role in creating safe spaces for fish to spawn and grow before spilling out into the open ocean to benefit environmental rejuvenation and fisheries alike. These have been…

A New Approach to Saving the Whales

Asha de Vos explains why our messages about saving whales are outdated, and what can be done to help save them.

Underwater Cultural Heritage As A Potential Environmental Time Bomb

In the area known as the Pacific theater of World War II, there are about “3800 underwater wrecks—submarines, airplanes, ship, and other remnants of hard fought battles.  And, that war produced 7800 such wrecks worldwide from all of the participating nations.  Beyond their solemn history (and possible continuing service as watery human gravesites), there are…

September 21, 2014: Living At Sea for 3 Years, Uncovering The Largest Ever Carnivore and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend radio, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they live on the world’s oceans for three years, create the largest marine protected area, road trip down a historical highway, protect power grids from hackers, eat our way through Rome, find the world’s meanest dinosaur ever, tear down dams, spy on cats, and teach our kids to be wild again.

Following Nemo: Clownfish Make Epic Ocean Journeys

Turns out finding Nemo could take a while—a new study reveals for the first time that baby clownfish travel up to 250 miles in search of a new reef.