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Tag archives for oceans

Inaction on Climate Change Has Dismal Consequences

The White House and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) released a new peer-reviewed report saying inaction on climate change is a dire threat to human health and the economy. It specifically estimates the physical monetary paybacks across 20 sectors of the United States by year 2100 if world leaders successfully limit global warming to…

Think Fast: What Bird Is This?

Artist and science illustrator Jane Kim is painting all 241 modern bird families on a giant mural at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. Learn how she captures details that make each species unique.

Achieving Sustainable Tuna

By Susan Jackson and Jennifer Dianto Kemmerly There is no endeavor quite like commercial tuna fishing. Perhaps no other industry is comprised of such a diverse group of stakeholders – with diverse opinions and approaches – that are so actively engaged in working toward a common goal. As many different voices weigh in to positively…

New Tool To Monitor Harmful Bacteria at Beaches

An international team, led by researchers has developed a new, timelier method to identify harmful bacteria levels on recreational beaches. The new model provides beach managers with a better prediction tool to identify when closures are required to protect beachgoers from harmful contaminates in the water. “The development of this new model has allowed us,…

Threatened Corals Swap “Algae” Partners to Survive Warming Oceans

A new research study showed why threatened Caribbean star corals sometimes swap partners to help them recover from bleaching events. The findings are important to understand the fate of coral reefs as ocean waters warm due to climate change. The University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science research team placed colonies…

Expedition Madagascar: Conserving Coral Reefs with Community Conservation

By Dr. Emily Darling

With colleagues from WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society), we recently surveyed the first community-led Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) in Madagascar. These areas provide genuine hope for coral reef conservation and small-scale fisheries management under the shadow of emerging oil and gas development, deforestation, illegal fishing and climate change.

Can Nature Make a Less Intense Hurricane Season a Less Risky One Too?

By Kathy Baughman McLeod, Director of Climate Risk & Resilience, The Nature Conservancy Last week, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Agency (NOAA) predicted a below average hurricane season this year for the Atlantic. Hearing their projections, the immediate reaction is a sigh of relief. But we know that it’s not just the intensity of storms,…

The West Coast Sardine Fishery is Closed: Not Because You Eat Sardines, but Because You Don’t

By Maria Finn As a food and lifestyle writer and someone who works in the seafood industry, I’ve long encouraged people to eat the little fish, particularly sardines, herring, anchovies and other small “forage” fish that are plentiful and local to California. This summer, the Pacific Fishery Management Council closed West Coast sardine fishing due…

Mapping Ocean Wealth – Informing a Sustainable Ocean Economy

By Mark Spalding, marine scientist, The Nature Conservancy I’m a somewhat recalcitrant tweeter. I’m not quite sure whether it’s worth the effort, but last month I joined a trending topic, a first for me. I tweeted: #IAmAScientistBecause I want to explain to people how much we all NEED nature. It was honest, but I wondered…

States, Nations Announce Commitments Ahead of U.N. Climate Conference

Roughly six months before international leaders meet in Paris for a United Nations climate change conference, U.S. states and foreign nations are stepping forward with climate commitments. Canada, on Friday, pledged to cut its greenhouse gas emissions 30 percent below 2005 levels by 2030. California is joining a climate agreement with eight foreign nations and…

Time For An Oil Change

By Annie Reisewitz and Sarah Martin It’s been calculated that a tanker leaking a drop of oil every 10 seconds releases 60 gallons of petroleum oil into the world’s oceans every year. Water, now more than ever, has become a precious resource in need of protection. We are facing a number of looming water-related crises…

No Ice in Sight: Polar Bears Scrabble Onshore to Find Food

On June 4, 1773, English naval officers were dispatched on an expedition to the Arctic. Their goal was to locate a passage from the British Isles to the Pacific Ocean. Instead, on ice floes near Spitsbergen (Svalbard), Norway, they found polar bears. The explorers were the first Europeans to describe the bears as a distinct…

Last Ice Area Expedition Launches

Climate projections forecast the total disappearance of summer sea ice in the Arctic by 2040, with the exception of one place: the “last ice area,” north of Greenland and Ellesmere Island in Nunavut. This area will likely harbor the largest concentration of Arctic wildlife that depends on the sea ice edge for survival, including bowhead…

Diving the Site of JFK’s WWII Shipwreck

While looking for bumphead parrot fish, it was striking to think of the future U.S. president, roughly at our age, brought for a very different reason to this same remote Pacific island.

Americans Compete With Asian Local Markets For Blue Crab

Last week, I traveled to Kien Giang Province in southern Vietnam to learn about the Vietnamese blue swimming crab fishery. Since 2009 a cross-sector partnership of government agencies, exporters, and WWF-Vietnam have been dealing with contentious issues related to the sustainability of this stock. In discussions with this coalition, I was struck by the contrast…