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Tag archives for paleontology

Heaven Is a Hole of Dirt

In the final stretch of the season’s excavations, Tanja becomes super excited when she discovers a jaw piece of an Omphalosaurus—a strange reptile that would shock dentists round the world.

Another Hill Bites The Dust

Snow, rain and wind may break our bones, but will never defeat us. Every inch of shale we remove to uncover fossilised bones, is a small victory for science. New species and discoveries are hiding in the mountain and we are full of excitement. Excavating a 247 million year old bone bed can be challenging,…

Back In Black – Shales

Professor and Emerging Explorer Jørn Hurum and his team, has returned to the Norwegian Arctic to search for fossils of ancient marine reptiles. We are back in the black Triassic rocks for two weeks to find some sensationally new finds of animals that lived in the seas over 240 million years ago. By Aubrey J…

Best Job Ever: Hunting for the Bones of a Loch Ness-Like Monster

Aubrey Jane Roberts is a National Geographic Young Explorers grantee and a professional dinosaur hunter (aka paleontologist).

Prehistoric Sea Monsters Emerge From the Arctic Landscape

This has been a season of surprises. Findings we thought would be huge, turned out to be, well, nothing, while finds we thought would be small turned into major excavations!

Ancient “Oddball” Mammal Reshuffles Family Tree?

A mysterious mammal that waded through South Asian swamps 48 million years ago is a distant cousin of modern rhinoceroses and tapirs, a new study says.

Photo: Mite Attacking Ant Entombed in Amber, Oldest Fossil of Its Kind

An ancient ant with a mite attached to its head is the oldest such fossil ever found, a new study says.

The End of a Triassic Adventure

The Spitsbergen Jurassic Research Group, led by National Geographic Explorer Dr. Jørn Hurum, is blazing its next great expedition to the icy rim of the world in search of stunningly preserved fossils. Wrapping up a great expedition, Aubrey and Victoria reflect on what was accomplished.

Guns, Bones and Polar Bears

The Spitsbergen Jurassic Research Group, led by National Geographic Explorer Dr. Jørn Hurum, is blazing its next great expedition to the icy rim of the world in search of stunningly preserved fossils. Polar bears are an ever-present threat to the fossil-hunters, but the team takes precautions to avoid unnecessary violence.

Midnight Sun Fun

The Spitsbergen Jurassic Research Group, led by National Geographic Explorer Dr. Jørn Hurum, is blazing its next great expedition to the icy rim of the world in search of stunningly preserved fossils. The midnight sun circles in an endless, natural rhythm as the team digs through perplexing terrain.

Bone Rush in the Arctic

The Spitsbergen Jurassic Research Group, led by National Geographic Explorer Dr. Jørn Hurum, is blazing its next great expedition to the icy rim of the world in search of stunningly preserved fossils. At last, the find that the team has been waiting for emerges!

Mega-Ichthyosaur Discovery on Svalbard

The Spitsbergen Jurassic Research Group, led by National Geographic Explorer Dr. Jørn Hurum, is blazing its next great expedition to the icy rim of the world in search of stunningly preserved fossils. As they make landfall, the danger of polar bear attack does nothing to dissuade the team from surveying the island.

Eyes of Desire—A New Jurassic Ichthyosaur From Spitsbergen

In 2010, an ichthyosaur was excavated by Jørn Hurum and his team on Svalbard. This ichthyosaur has now been formally described as a new species, Janusaurus lundi—but we like to call him “Mascot.”

The Hunt for Triassic Sea Monsters in Svalbard Is On

The Spitsbergen Jurassic Research Group, led by National Geographic Explorer Dr. Jørn Hurum, is blazing its next great expedition to the icy rim of the world in search of stunningly preserved fossils. As the expedition finally gets under way, fair skies and fields of wildflowers greet the group.

Dinosaur Footprints on the Roof… Of the World!

Canyons and plains in middle latitudes aren’t the only places to hunt for dinosaurs. Paleontologists are also tracking dinosaurs under the midnight sun in Svalbard.