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Tag archives for Panthera

Fumbling Cougar Kittens: Learning to Hunt

We recently captured F99, a now 1-year old, orphaned, female cougar kitten followed by Panthera’s Teton Cougar Project (see post Why Adult Cougars Kill Each Other? for how she was orphaned and Orphaned Cougar Kittens and Their Inspiring Will to Survive for some of her adventures since). We swapped out the tiny, expandable collar that…

Philanthropists Pledge $80 Million for Wild Cat Conservation

Environmental philanthropists from China, India, the United Arab Emirates and the United States have together committed U.S. $80 million over ten years to help fund conservation of all 38 species of wild cats.

Frozen Food: Winter Woes for Cougars

It was dark, and cold. Under cover of night, F61, an adult female mountain lion currently followed by Panthera’s Teton Cougar Project, padded softly back to her kill. Drew Rush, on assignment for National Geographic’s article “Ghost Cats” had visited while she was away, and set up a motion-triggered camera to photograph her upon her…

Killing Sprees of a Mother Lioness

It was one of those eerily beautiful winter mornings in Central Mozambique. Smoke hung thick in the air from the seasonal fires that had begun raging across the land, and Bob Poole and I hopped into his land rover and headed in to Gorongosa National Park towards a signal that had just come in. Helena (a…

January 26, 2014: Riding Rio Roosevelt’s Rapids, Sliding Headfirst at 90 MPH and More

Join radio host Boyd Matson and his guests as they paddle Class V rapids on the River of Doubt, hand cycle the length of the Americas, investigate deaths from common drugs, preserve lions’ disappearing prides, slide headfirst down an icy track at 90 miles per hour, and reconcile the future and the past in the Amazon Rainforest.

Fecundity and Cougar Kittens

F51, an adult female mountain lion currently followed by Panthera’s Teton Cougar Project, has given birth to three litters in three years, which as far as we know, is something of an anomaly. F51 immigrated into our study area from some unknown place and we started tracking her at the very start of 2011, just…

Saving the Big Cats of Central Mozambique

It wasn’t too long ago that Central Mozambique was considered lost territory for the big cats, a place where they would soon no longer roam wild and free. But today an effort is underway to hold the line against extinction and ensure that the African lion has its rightful place here into the foreseeable future.  This thanks…

Elk, It’s What’s for Dinner… In Winter

It’s akin to a light switch; it’s that stark. One day mountain lions inhabiting the Southern Yellowstone Ecosystem are predominantly killing mule deer, and the next day they all switch to killing elk. And then they kill elk for five to five and a half months before they switch back to deer. It happens on…

Hunters or Hunted? Wolves vs. Mountain Lions

Wolves are coursing, social predators that operate in packs to select disadvantaged prey in open areas where they can test their prey’s condition. Mountain lions are solitary, ambush predators that select prey opportunistically (i.e., of any health) in areas where slopes, trees, boulders, or other cover gives them an advantage. Thus, wolves and cougars inhabit…

Understanding America’s Big Cat: An Introduction to the Teton Cougar Project

Mountain lion, cougar, puma, panther, catamount, léon, Puma concolor. These are among the many names used to describe this large, lithe, solitary felid that ranges from southernmost Alaska to the tip of Tierra del Fuego. Concolor means “single color” and is meant to describe the uniform pelage of adult animals. However, those of us who…

Fate of the Jaguar: A Conversation with Panthera’s Dr. Howard Quigley

News Watch Contributor Dr. Jordan Schaul interviews Dr. Howard Quigley of Panthera about the status of the jaguar. Like many apex predators the jaguar serves as a national symbol for multiple countries, where it is revered as a most powerful and stealthy predator. The iconic wild felid is a member of the pantherine lineage of…

Sumatra Sanctuary Reports “Unexpected Density” of Tigers

It’s not often we have good news to report for the world’s remaining wild tigers. This week Panthera, a global big cat conservation organization, said a preliminary survey it helped organize had discovered an unexpected density of wild tigers in the southern section of Tambling Wildlife Nature Conservation (TWNC), a privately managed concession on Indonesia’s Sumatra island.

Lion Numbers Plunge as African Wilderness Succumbs to Human Pressure

The king of the African savannah is in serious trouble because people are taking over the continent’s last patches of wilderness on unprecedented scale, according to a detailed study released this week. The most comprehensive assessment of lion (Panthera leo) numbers to date determined that Africa’s once-thriving savannahs are undergoing massive land-use conversion and burgeoning human population growth. The decline has had a significant impact on the lions that make their home in these savannahs; their numbers have dropped to as low as 32,000, down from hundreds of thousands estimated just 50 years ago.

Finding the Last Cheetahs of Iran

This week, National Geographic magazine published extraordinary new images of wild Asiatic cheetahs in Iran. That National Geographic was able to photograph these rarest of cheetahs is testament to 11 years of conservation work by the Iranian Department of Environment. As the only country on Earth that has managed to keep this remarkable cat alive, Iran deserves to be congratulated. (Photo by Frans Lanting, from the November 2012 issue of National Geographic Magazine.)

Cute – but endangered – The Lions of Gir

After having spent an amazing time in the vicinity of this incredible animal, I only hope that the right people will change their mind and give these lions a chance, so that we once again can see them roam freely as they should – Uri Golman