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Tag archives for Peru

Threads That Speak: Unraveling the Mysteries of the Inca

One of the great mysteries of ancient Peru is that the Inca did not have a system of writing, but communicated with a system of strings tied with knots. For the first time, centuries-old knotted textile accounting records known as quipus were found buried with well-preserved organic material. They were found at the archaeological site of Incahuasi, the base of operations for the Inca expansion along Peru’s southern coast.

Entrepreneurship and Empowerment Is Saving this Important Archaeological Site

Pachacamac is one of the longest inhabited ancient settlements in the Americas. An important religious center, the vast complex is today just 30 miles outside of the Lima, the most populous city in Peru. As a result, Pachacamac faces the threat of invasion and exploitation. Creating business opportunities and related education opportunities for the community encourages the local people to take ownership of the site and protect it from destruction. Through efforts with the Sustainable Preservation Initiative (SPI), the community now builds futures and saves pasts for its residents.

This Peruvian Beach Town Has 3,500 Years of Cultural Continuity

Archaeologist and National Geographic explorer Gabriel Prieto returned to his hometown of Huanchaco, Peru to tell the story of its 3,500 years of cultural continuity and involve the local community in discovering their past.

How 3-D Imaging Helps Archaeologists Preserve the Past

Archaeologist and National Geographic explorer Luis Jaime Castillo and archaeologist Carlos Wester are determined to protect the cultural heritage at the pyramid complex of Chotuna-Chornancap, which was built by the Sicán, or Lambayeque, over a thousand years ago on the north coast of Peru. Using photography to produce 3-D models of the excavations and where water damage might occur allows them to help preserve the sites.

New Threats Emphasize Need for Proactive Amazon Jaguar Conservation Planning

Now facing hunting pressure to meet a growing demand for trade in its parts, the jaguar occupies a special place in the history, culture, and traditions of Latin America. Revered for centuries by indigenous peoples for its strength and agility, the jaguar may well depend for its continued existence upon the care and cooperation of those who continue to live with this extraordinary animal.

‘Things Shouldn’t Be Like This’: Lingering Effects of Peru’s Jungle Oil Spills

On August 10, the fourth oil spill since the start of 2016 was reported in the Peruvian Amazon. More than 20 similar spills have crippled the region over the past five years.

Puppies and Scientists Team Up Against Zika and Other Diseases

In the fight against Zika, bubonic plague, and other infectious diseases in the Amazon, microbial biologist and National Geographic grantee Ryan Jones has found an unlikely and adorable ally: puppies.

Indigenous Amazonians Reeling From Oil Spills in the Jungle

An oil pipe can burst anywhere, even deep in the Amazon. Even there, not only does the environment suffer, people must struggle with far-ranging damage and contamination.

Sustainable Gastronomy to Conserve the Amazon’s Cultural and Natural Diversity

By Julie Kunen Last month, I joined a group of fellow conservationists, chefs, journalists, public health experts, and entrepreneurs in the Peru to discuss how sustainable gastronomy might contribute to conserving the cultural and natural diversity of the Amazon. Representing Latin American nations and the United States, we were united in our passion for the…

Peru Affords Full Protection to World’s Largest Known Manta Population

In a significant move to safeguard the world’s largest known manta population, Peru’s Ministry of Production announced on January 1, strong regulations to protect the oceanic manta ray. It is now illegal to target, capture, and retain a manta ray or trade in any manta parts across their entire range, from Peru to Ecuador, where they are already legally protected.

The Río Marañón Is Moving: Dam Construction in a Volatile Landscape

Explorers launched a raft expedition in Peru to collect data on the Río Marañón, the headwater stem to the Amazon River. The river is under threat of 2 approved dams and almost 20 more proposed dams. The team faced class V rapids and landslides to collect baseline data along the river corridor prior to dam construction.

Satsuma Fields: Encounters with the diaspora provoke reflections on what it means to be Japanese

When the Sakura Maru departed from Yokohama in February 1899 bound for the Peruvian port city of Callao, its 790 passengers must have had high hopes. The Meiji Government had been run campaigns advertising a better quality of life overseas, and the Morioka Emigration Company and other agents promised solid pay for four-year contracts on…

The Skeletons of Olmos, Part III: How to Uncover a Skeleton’s Secrets

When bioarchaeologists examine skeletons, what do we really look at? To help you understand our findings, this installment will answer the question, How can one “read” ancient bones and teeth?

Much Maligned REDD+ Gets a Boost from Above for Climate Mitigation

LIMA, Peru (Dec. 8) – As the United Nations climate negotiations enter their second and final week, some progress – and thus some optimism — was claimed late Monday. They were small steps. And because huge leaps seem impossible in grappling with this global crisis, even small steps take on growing importance. At a carefully…

Unilever CEO: The saving face of corporate climate change

LIMA, Peru — The man behind the podium Sunday at the Global Landscapes Forum, an offshoot of the annual United Nations negotiations on climate change being held here, spoke in blunt terms: “Commercial agriculture accounted for 71 percent of tropical deforestation in the last 12 years. That translates into the loss of 130 million hectares…