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Tag archives for Peru

‘Things Shouldn’t Be Like This’: Lingering Effects of Peru’s Jungle Oil Spills

On August 10, the fourth oil spill since the start of 2016 was reported in the Peruvian Amazon. More than 20 similar spills have crippled the region over the past five years.

Puppies and Scientists Team Up Against Zika and Other Diseases

In the fight against Zika, bubonic plague, and other infectious diseases in the Amazon, microbial biologist and National Geographic grantee Ryan Jones has found an unlikely and adorable ally: puppies.

Indigenous Amazonians Reeling From Oil Spills in the Jungle

An oil pipe can burst anywhere, even deep in the Amazon. Even there, not only does the environment suffer, people must struggle with far-ranging damage and contamination.

Sustainable Gastronomy to Conserve the Amazon’s Cultural and Natural Diversity

By Julie Kunen Last month, I joined a group of fellow conservationists, chefs, journalists, public health experts, and entrepreneurs in the Peru to discuss how sustainable gastronomy might contribute to conserving the cultural and natural diversity of the Amazon. Representing Latin American nations and the United States, we were united in our passion for the…

Peru Affords Full Protection to World’s Largest Known Manta Population

In a significant move to safeguard the world’s largest known manta population, Peru’s Ministry of Production announced on January 1, strong regulations to protect the oceanic manta ray. It is now illegal to target, capture, and retain a manta ray or trade in any manta parts across their entire range, from Peru to Ecuador, where they are already legally protected.

The Río Marañón Is Moving: Dam Construction in a Volatile Landscape

Explorers launched a raft expedition in Peru to collect data on the Río Marañón, the headwater stem to the Amazon River. The river is under threat of 2 approved dams and almost 20 more proposed dams. The team faced class V rapids and landslides to collect baseline data along the river corridor prior to dam construction.

Satsuma Fields: Encounters with the diaspora provoke reflections on what it means to be Japanese

When the Sakura Maru departed from Yokohama in February 1899 bound for the Peruvian port city of Callao, its 790 passengers must have had high hopes. The Meiji Government had been run campaigns advertising a better quality of life overseas, and the Morioka Emigration Company and other agents promised solid pay for four-year contracts on…

The Skeletons of Olmos, Part III: How to Uncover a Skeleton’s Secrets

When bioarchaeologists examine skeletons, what do we really look at? To help you understand our findings, this installment will answer the question, How can one “read” ancient bones and teeth?

Much Maligned REDD+ Gets a Boost from Above for Climate Mitigation

LIMA, Peru (Dec. 8) – As the United Nations climate negotiations enter their second and final week, some progress – and thus some optimism — was claimed late Monday. They were small steps. And because huge leaps seem impossible in grappling with this global crisis, even small steps take on growing importance. At a carefully…

Unilever CEO: The saving face of corporate climate change

LIMA, Peru — The man behind the podium Sunday at the Global Landscapes Forum, an offshoot of the annual United Nations negotiations on climate change being held here, spoke in blunt terms: “Commercial agriculture accounted for 71 percent of tropical deforestation in the last 12 years. That translates into the loss of 130 million hectares…

Now starring as diplomat: Bianca Jagger defends forests at UN climate talks in Peru

LIMA, Peru – Whatever her youthful reputation as the wife of a world-famous rock star and glittery jet setter, Bianca Jagger has committed much of the past 30 years of her life to advancing causes associated with human rights and environmental protection in the developing world. On Sunday morning, during a side event connected with…

Chimpanzees and the Battle Over Human Nature

Were humans born to war? Or is warfare a recent, rare development in our history? Studies of chimps and early human civilizations give clues to the origins of this kind of violence.

The Skeletons of Olmos, Part II: Racing Against the Storm

The ancient skeletons of Olmos don’t give up their secrets easily, and with both a construction project and El Niño threatening to destroy them, time is of the essence!

New Poison Frog Species Evolving Before Our Eyes, Study Says

A poison dart frog from Peru that mimics its neighbors in incredible detail is evolving into a new species, scientists believe.

Traditional Fishing With Poison Deployed for Science

By Emma Marris

A traditional fishing technique has been incorporated into a scientific study of the fish of the Amazon basin.