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Pangolins On The Brink

My focus in particular is the pangolin: a small, scaly, creature, rather like an armadillo, with an innocent nature, despite its resemblance to a four-footed, flightless dragon. It is also the world’s most highly-traded mammal, with more than a million being poached from the wild over the last decade, according to the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN). The organization says a pangolin is taken from the wild, either to be killed or sold, every five minutes.

DJI announces Mavic Pro

The latest in the Drones and Small Unmanned Aerial Systems Special Series, in which Kike profiles interesting information, research and thoughts on using drones, UAVs and remotely piloted vehicles for journalism and photography. New York – Yesterday DJI launched the new Mavic Pro, a compact yet powerful drone. It incorporates 24 high-performance computing cores, an all-new transmission system with a…

Devil rays in distress: Protecting the “mini mantas”

Why devil rays, or “mini mantas,” need our help!

Five Reasons Why the Phantom 4 has Become One of my Favorite Tools.

The latest in the Drones and Small Unmanned Aerial Systems Special Series, in which Kike profiles interesting information, research and thoughts on using drones, UAVs and remotely piloted vehicles for journalism and photography.   This article has been on the pipeline for some time now. I have been field testing the Phantom 4 on my recent expeditions to Svalbard…

Face-to-Face With Wildlife in Florida’s Hidden Wilderness: #bestjobever

Encounters with massive alligator gars, manatees, and rattlesnakes are all par for the course when National Geographic photographer Carlton Ward embarks on a 1,000 mile, 70 day trek to protect Florida’s hidden wilderness.

NPS Centennial: Celebrating Conservation Worldwide

As we celebrate the centennial anniversary of the National Parks Service and look at the effect that protected lands and parks around the world have had on those who visit them, we see that protected lands are far more valuable than simply providing a place for a camping trip. The protected lands around the world enable people to wonder, to study, and to share their experiences with others through conservation and inspiration, though they may be a world apart.

Commitments to Accelerate the Safe Integration of Unmanned Aircraft Systems in the United States

The latest in the Drones and Small Unmanned Aerial Systems Special Series, in which Kike profiles interesting information, research and thoughts on using drones, UAVs and remotely piloted vehicles for journalism and photography.   WASHINGTON, DC – Since President Obama took office in 2009, developments in aviation, sensing, and software technology have powered a revolution in unmanned flight. In…

Journey Through the Largest Cave in the World

Sơn Đoòng Cave—the largest in the world—wasn’t discovered until 2009. Now, National Geographic grantee and photojournalist Martin Edström, takes us deep inside Sơn Đoòng, as he tries to capture its overwhelming size and beauty in 360 degrees.

World Oceans Day Celebrated in Compelling Photos

From the vastness of the world’s oceans, the mystery of underwater ecosystems to humankind’s reliance on marine processes, the ocean is a wonderfully strange, altogether necessary part of our world. It is on World Oceans Day that we reflect on all of the benefits, mysteries, and wonders of the ocean.

Prison No Place for Our Dying Species

But on this day, I am on a very different assignment. There is no freedom here, and for the whale shark that swims past me at speed, there is no escape either. This is a marine pen, housing two young sharks, on a small island in the Maluku Sea, Indonesia.

Secrets of Stunning Ocean Photography

National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence Dr. Enric Sala has visited and photographed some of the most remote and beautiful places in the ocean. Hear him reveal what he’s learned.

The manta in the mirror

By John Weller and Shawn Heinrichs A meeting of minds Chain upon chain of jagged islands jutted up from the sea. Dense vegetation clung to black, pitted rock walls that dropped sharply into cerulean blue lagoons. A Sulfur-crested Cockatoo landed in the top of a tree, its raucous call bouncing around the cliffs before daring out…

The tribes of Ethiopia’s Lower Omo Valley in Photographs

    The Omo River rises on the mountainous plateau of Ethiopia’s Shewan Highlands, then flows for hundreds of kilometres through lush grasslands, acacia plains and riverine forests, until it reaches Kenya’s Lake Turkana. The river’s lower valley, in the southwest corner of the country, is a wild, beautiful, remote region.  In the mud and volcanic…

Bhutan Rising: Democracy from Scratch

Bhutan is a relative newcomer to modernity: the country’s first paved road was completed in 1962, and the Internet and TV were not introduced until 1999. Since 2000, however, the pace of its development has snowballed. That acceleration is particularly evident in the country’s shifting demographics. Sixty percent of the Bhutan’s population is below the age of 34. While some people work on farms, more and more prefer to live and work in cities such as Thimphu, the capital. It’s easier than ever to move to those cities, but difficult to find jobs in them.

Sumatran Tigers, Close to Extinction

Conservationists put the number of Sumatran tigers in the wild at around 300. It’s a devastating statistic, particularly given that Indonesia has already lost the Bali and Javan tiger which were both hunted to extinction. Without a serious overhaul of its present laws on wildlife crime, Indonesia can presume that the Sumatran tiger is in its dying days. It is a heartbreaking notion, but with the right level of deterrence and education, it is one that does not have to become reality.