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Watch Nat Geo’s Roundup of Best Octopus Videos

What better way to mark International Octopus Day than with a roundup of some of our favorite octopus videos. Watch as they battle it out with other sea creatures.

“Remarkable” Spider Eats Mostly Mosquitoes—Could It Fight Malaria?

A jumping spider in Malaysia eats mosquitoes of various species and ages—an unusual preference that could inspire ways to combat malaria and another diseases.

Mongoose Fends Off Lions: Explaining Viral Video

A mongoose that survived a tussle with four African lions may have been dealing with playful youngsters, a biologist says.

Watch: Fish and Eels Team Up to Catch Prey—Rare Among Animals

Talk about lending a helping “fin”—groupers and eels in a coral reef work together to catch prey, a new study says.

How Frogs’ Sticky Tongues Lift Giant Prey

The super-fast tongue of the horned frog is also a super-powerful adhesive, a new study discovers.

How Catfish Stalk Prey in the Dark

Catfish searching for prey in the dark detect slight chemical changes in the water produced by the breath of a sea worm, a new study says.

Watch: First Video of Fish Leaping Into Air to Prey on Birds

This is the first time researchers have observed fish leaping into the air to prey on birds on the wing.

Why Does the Seahorse Have Its Odd Head? Mystery Solved

The shape of the seahorse’s head helps it sneak up on copepods without being noticed, a new study says.

A Venom First: Toxin-Spewing Crustacean

Tiny, blind, cave-dwelling creature turns its prey into milkshakes.

Praying Mantis Mimics Flower to Trick Prey

A praying mantis in Malaysia mimics an orchid to get a meal—the first scientific evidence of an animal imitating a flower to attract prey.

Masters of Deception: 5 Two-Faced Species

A spider with a happy face on its back, an orchid that looks like a monkey, and a bug with a peanut head are among nature’s tricksters.

New Electric Fish Found, Are Wired Differently

Researchers were shocked to discover that the two Amazon-dwelling fish are wired much differently, a new study says.

Plants “Hear” Herbivores Coming—and Prepare

New research shows that plants ‘eavesdrop’ on their attackers to help defend themselves.