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Changing Arctic: On Board Healy Icebreaker

The newest and most technologically advanced polar icebreaker in the United States fleet is the US Coast Guard icebreaker Healy. The Healy is involved in research in the Arctic, where 80 crew members and 50 scientists are often at sea for weeks on end.

Understanding Dogs to Protect Cats

Post submitted by Matthias Fiechter Feral dogs have been seen chasing snow leopards and bears away from their prey. Growing populations of free-ranging dogs are becoming a real threat to wildlife in many parts of the snow leopard’s range. Liu Mingyu, a researcher in China, is tracking dogs with GPS collars to better understand their behavior…

Cryptic Cannibals: Sea Slugs in the Bahamas

The following is a blog post by Carolyn Belak, sea slug enthusiast and scientific aid at the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Andy Kough, postdoctoral research associate at Shedd Aquarium. When one thinks of the Bahamas, they probably picture miles of white sandy beaches, dolphins dancing through crystal blue waters and colorful fish…

Engaging Learners From Afar with Shedd Aquarium’s Iguana Field Research

The following is a blog post by Jackie Formoso, Manager of Learning Programs at Shedd Aquarium, about her experience co-leading Shedd’s research on Bahamian rock iguanas in the Exuma Islands. As part of Shedd Aquarium’s ongoing commitment to preserving wildlife for future generations, we have a team of scientists who are working hard to study endangered species,…

Conch-quest to the Bahamas to Study Vital Local Fishery

The following is a blog post by Dr. Andy Kough, post-doctoral research associate at Shedd Aquarium, about his recent research trip to the Bahamas to study queen conch populations. At the beginning of June, my colleagues at Shedd Aquarium and I completed five weeks of intensive fieldwork to assess queen conch populations within Marine Protected Areas…

Best Job Ever: Mapping “California’s Galápagos”

Cartographers and National Geographic grantees Marty Schnure and Ross Donihue traveled to the little-known Farallon National Wildlife Refuge to document the scientists who live there and to create an interactive digital map to allow the public to explore the islands from afar. The Farallon National Wildlife Refuge is closed to public access to protect this…

C40 launches new report showcasing obstacles and solutions to climate action in cities

For the first time, representatives from more than 80 of the world’s largest cities have revealed the barriers that are limiting their ambitions to tackle climate change, in a new analysis released today by C40 Cities Climate Leadership Group (C40). Unlocking Climate Action in Megacities also presents a corresponding set of innovative and replicable solutions to overcome…

The manta in the mirror

By John Weller and Shawn Heinrichs A meeting of minds Chain upon chain of jagged islands jutted up from the sea. Dense vegetation clung to black, pitted rock walls that dropped sharply into cerulean blue lagoons. A Sulfur-crested Cockatoo landed in the top of a tree, its raucous call bouncing around the cliffs before daring out…

Tracking Tigers Is Just As Dangerous As It Sounds

Matthew Luskin is a conservation biologist, wildlife ecologist, and National Geographic grantee. He spent a year in the rain forest of Indonesia tracking tigers through the remaining three largest national parks—and it was seriously dangerous. “When there’s a tiger around you can’t sleep. You can barely eat. You can’t do anything because all you are…

Gaining a better understanding of the seas through citizen science

Co-authored by Erica Cirino Twice a day, every day, Kera Mathes hops aboard a ship that sets off from Long Beach Harbor in California. As education specialist at the Long Beach Aquarium of the Pacific, she helps visitors aboard the ship identify the animals they see. Mathes also supervises the aquarium’s interns (college students and…

World’s Largest Fish and One Tiny Island: Studying Whale Sharks on St. Helena Island

Dr. Alistair Dove, director of research and conservation at Georgia Aquarium recounts his recent expedition to St. Helena Island studying the world’s largest fish – whale sharks. Approximately 2,500 miles east of Rio de Janeiro and just over 1,200 miles west of the African country of Angola, lies St. Helena Island: one of the most…

When Ice Melts: Tipping the Scales in the Predator/Prey Arms Race in Antarctica

The Lindblad Expeditions-National Geographic (LEX-NG) Fund aims to protect the last wild places in the ocean while facilitating conservation, research, education, and community development programs in the places we explore. This blog entry spotlights some of the exciting work our grantees are doing with support from the LEX-NG Fund. A man is poised with a…

Groundbreaking C40 Research Proves Cities are Critical

With nearly all the world’s countries signing the Paris Agreement to fight climate change last month, there was also a growing recognition of the role cities are playing in this effort. Suffice it to say, 2015 was a big year for cities and climate change. Relatedly, it was also a big year for the C40…

Whales Speak: Breaking Down Language Barriers

The Lindblad Expeditions-National Geographic (LEX-NG) Fund aims to protect the last wild places in the ocean while facilitating conservation, research, education, and community development programs in the places we explore. This blog entry spotlights some of the exciting work our grantees are doing with support from the LEX-NG Fund. By Madeleine Pauchet Along the coast…

The Mysterious Life of Mister K: A Seahorse Life History Study in Cambodia

Guest post by Delphine Duplain and Amick Haissoune, project coordinators at Marine Conservation Cambodia, in conjunction with Dr. Tse-Lynn Loh, postdoctoral research associate at Shedd Aquarium Once upon a time, there were some buoys marking the edges of our house reef off Koh Seh in Kep Province, Cambodia, thus protecting the reef from passing boats. Surprisingly,…