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Bhutan: a Frontier for Culture, Biodiversity, and Adventure

Bhutan straddles an area with high biodiversity richness—the Eastern Himalayas. Precipitation from the monsoons, great altitudinal variation, and its location connecting the Indian plains to the high Himalayan peaks on the edge of the Tibetan plateau allow for an amazing assemblage of biodiversity that is still being discovered today. Bhutan is the only place on Earth where snow leopards and tigers share the same habitat. Recent survey results show that both these endangered large cats are not only surviving, but thriving, in Bhutan. And this is only one example of how Bhutan is a coveted destination for scientific exploration and adventure, writes Tshewang Wangchuk, the first Bhutanese National Geographic explorer, and Executive Director for the Bhutan Foundation in Washington, D.C .

Poaching Crisis in Indonesia’s Leuser Ecosystem

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic News Watch blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text and photo from iLCP Fellow Paul Hilton. UPDATE FROM THE FIELD: Paul Hilton and FKL Rangers Expose Wildlife Poaching in…

What it Means to be a Threatened Species

Most people know what it means to be a threatened species—it’s something that’s rare and may become extinct. What isn’t often explained is how we know something is threatened and who decides whether a species is threatened or not. Read almost any article about species in peril and there will be some reference to the…

January 12, 2014: Climbing Buildings, Hunting Poachers and More

Join host National Geographic Weekend host Boyd Matson and his guests as they climb the world’s tallest buildings, ski with the sport’s inventors, give new life to Christmas trees, seek sea life at the bottom of the ocean, discover the unicorn, protect rhinos by hunting for poachers, kayak blind through the Grand Canyon, prioritize protection plans for endangered species, and track the world’s underground water reserves.

Rare Video Captures Tiger Making Its Kill

By K. Ullas Karanth, Director for Science-Asia at the Wildlife Conservation Society Tigers are the largest of all living wildcats. Over the course of two million years, nature fine-tuned them as master predators through a trial-and-error process we call Darwinian evolution. Hunting alone, a tiger can take down prey four to five times its own…

December 1, 2013: Running the Amazon from New Source to Sea, Fact Checking Thanksgiving and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend radio show, join host Boyd Matson, as he and his guests paddle the length of the Amazon River, see Jerusalem through the eyes of its citizens, debunk Thanksgiving’s creation myths, and taking selfies with tigers.

Rediscovering Cultural Connections to Wild India: Tiger Shrines in Unexpected Places

In a forest seemingly devoid of wildlife, and explorer chances upon hand-crafted idols that show a deep connection between the people and animals of the area.

November 3, 2013: How to Survive an Avalanche, Following Family History Through Asia and More

Join host Boyd Matson, as we survive potentially disastrous avalanche, swim with manta rays in Mozambique, walk the length of Africa looking for water, and follow our family tree’s roots throughout Asia.

September 29, 2013: Photographing Every Animal in Captivity, Saving Apes from Guerillas, and More

Join us this week, as we set a world record kayaking 151 miles in 24 hours, then build an Ark to help save all of the world’s animals, teach pandas to breed successfully, and finally, rekindle old friendships with indigenous people in Nepal after 45 years apart.

September 22, 2013: Paddling the Americas, Blind Date Adventures, and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, as we pursue adrenaline and white water throughout the Americas, blind date for 200 miles down Alaska’s Lost Coast, and learn to thrive despite past failures.

September 8, 2013: Paddling Through Russia’s Remotest Rivers, Playing Matchmaker for Rhinos, and More

Join us this week, as we paddle 3,000 miles through the remotest rivers in Mongolia and Russia, try to help in Syria’s civil war by starting a children’s camp for refugees, create a dating game for rhinos, film Africa’s disappearing megafauna, and ride hogs across the United States.

July 14, 2013: Leaving Your Spouse In the Death Zone, Brokering a Human-Tiger Peace, and More

This week, we summit all of 14 of the world’s 8,000 metre peaks with the first woman to do so, then we try to reduce human-animal conflict across India, and finally, we meet some of the world’s ugliest critters.

Rescued Bear Tales of Two of Hollywood’s Most Acclaimed Sibling Actors — Eric & Julia Roberts

National Geographic science contributor Dr. Jordan Schaul shares some famous bear tales regarding the international travel of two of Hollywood’s most acclaimed sibling actors. Occasionally, I interview people in the entertainment industry (link).  Among them are famed Hollywood stars making quite a positive impact on animal welfare and wildlife conservation. This includes addressing concerns that…

Top 10 Headlines Today: Meteor Shower Today, Nazi Diary Discovered…

The top 10 stories on our radar today: Skywatchers this morning may have witnessed a rare meteor shower, the diary of Hitler’s confidant will soon be unveiled to the public, and …

Let’s Fact Check the Oscar-Winner ‘Life of Pi’

So maybe Life of Pi didn’t take the whole Oscar cake (forgive me, father, for my puns). But the movie was definitely a winner – best director, best visual effects, best cinematography, best score. It was also the highest-grossing Oscar nominated film … in India last year, where it took in a reported $17 million.…