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WWF’s Living Planet Report echoed on the Great Barrier Reef

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic News Watch blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text and photos by iLCP Fellow James Morgan For decades, the Great Barrier Reef has enjoyed World Heritage Status and been…

Palau Expedition: Pristine Paradise

Pristine Paradise. Palau. It sounds like a mantra, which one cannot help but repeating after being there. We just finished a Pristine Seas expedition to Palau, invited by the government to explore, survey, and document the underwater world of this little island nation that is also a large ocean nation. Unlike other Pristine Seas expeditions—typically…

Busting Indonesia’s Manta Gill Trade

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic News Watch blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text and photos by iLCP Fellow Paul Hilton. Writing this from a hotel room in Indonesia’s second-largest city, Surabaya, I realize…

Transforming Indonesia’s Manta Fisheries

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic News Watch blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text and photos by iLCP Fellow Shawn Heinrichs Transforming Indonesia’s Manta Fisheries: The path to creating an effective Manta Sanctuary Indonesia announced…

Maasai Steppe Warrior for Wildlife Elvis Kisimir Speaks Up for Lions

“In a few years to come, the world will only see the rare lion spoor on the sandy soil. If the wind blows, then even those spoor will go.” One extraordinary Maasai warrior shares his message for the world about the future of big cats. Elvis Kisimir experiences the full extent of familial responsibility while…

The Last Spring: Protecting Florida’s Manatees

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic News Watch blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text by iLCP Fellow and Founder Cristina Goettsch Mittermeier Photos by iLCP Fellow Paul Nicklen One of the things I love…

May 11, 2014: Capturing the Spirit of Adventure, Saving Sea Turtles and More

Every week, embark with host Boyd Matson on an exploration of the latest discoveries and interviews with some of the most fascinating people on the planet, on National Geographic Weekend. Please check listings near you to find the best way to listen to National Geographic Weekend on radio, or listen below! Hour 1 – Adventurers who regularly push their limits of…

Geography in the News: Bali, Past Trouble in Paradise

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM Bali: Past Trouble in Paradise In August 2009, an elite Indonesian police squad killed a man believed to be the most wanted Islamic terrorist in Southeast Asia. Noordin Mohammad Top, a Malaysian born militant, was linked to bombings in Jakarta, Indonesia, and the 2002 bombings on…

Geography in the News: Curaçao, Newly Independent Micro-State?

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM Curaçao: The Western Hemisphere’s Newly Independent Micro-State Curaçao became a quasi-independent country Oct. 10, 2010, making it one of the world’s 195 recognized countries, according to the U.S. State Department. In a change of constitutional status that dissolved the Dutch Antilles, Curaçao (pronounced “cure…

OAS Nod Leads Off a 2013 Geotourism Roundup

Well into its second decade, the geotourism proposition—that it’s good to develop tourism business based on the character of the place being visited—gains an endorsement from the Organization of American States. Read more for a roundup of 2013 geotourism goings on.

Geography in the News: Pike’s Peak

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM and Maps.com COLORADO’S MOST FAMOUS MOUNTAIN The state of Colorado and relatives of Zebulon Montgomery Pike celebrated the 200th anniversary in 2006 of the historic expedition that put Pikes Peak on the map. Advertised as “America’s mountain,” Pikes Peak is an iconic equivalent to…

Tiger Tourism: Can Travel Help Save These Big Cats?

Tigers are one of the most charismatic and beautiful animals on earth. They are the world’s largest cat and can live across a wide range of habitats, from mountains to coastal wetlands. Most of the world’s tigers live in India within the borders of a number of national parks and tiger reserves; but their numbers…

The One Billionth Tourist

Today, for the one billionth time this year, yet another tourist crossed an international border. That’s a historic milestone. According to the United Nations World Tourism Organization, 2012 will mark the first year in history to register more than a billion international arrivals. UNWTO picked Dec. 13 as the most likely day for the moment…

“Hiram Bingham, Please Pick Up a White Paging Telephone . . . “

A new airport will soon be in the works in Chinchero, Peru. The plan is part of an effort to boost tourism to the Inca ruins of Machu Picchu, according to Peru’s President Ollanta Humala. But questions have been raised about how much more traffic the ruins can accommodate.

The Return of the Cheetah

Deep in the Karoo of South Africa’s Eastern Cape is a land starting over.  The air is dry, the ground recovering from drought, and on high plateaus great plains of golden grass are home to large herds of zebra, red hartebeest, blesbuck and wildebeest.  The animals never descend to the bushland below which is also…