VOICES Voices Icon Ideas and Insight From Explorers

Menu

Tag archives for travel

Ross Sea MPA creation means the last pristine place in the ocean is finally protected

The pursuit to establish a marine protected area in Antarctica brought me to the Ross Sea four times. It brought my wife, and eventually my daughter, whom we named after a penguin. – John Weller

Devil rays in distress: Protecting the “mini mantas”

Why devil rays, or “mini mantas,” need our help!

Would You Walk Into a Room With Millions of Bees?

Explorer and National Geographic grantee Chris Bashinelli visited rural Uganda to do a cultural exchange with small-scale farmers. He decided to face his fear of bees by going right into an apiary filled with venomous bees.

Plastic: The big breakup

Co-authored by Erica Cirino My dog Foosa and I step onto the beach, and in the first few steps I find—as usual—something made of plastic. This beach is strewn with everything from fiberglass buoys to crumbling Styrofoam cups to poorly disposed “disposable” lighters to plastic bags (use once, throw away, except that “away” is here).…

National Parks: Celebrating a Sentinel of American Memory

Krista Schlyer writes on the beauty and memory of National Parks. “It isn’t just beauty we see in these places, and in infinite others in the National Park System–it’s memory. Memory of another time, another life, when we lived in seamless connection to the system of nature. Written on this body of Earth is the prose of universal memory. We as humans are but a word of it.”

HOW MILLENNIALS ARE COMING TOGETHER

A few months ago, two researchers from the Harvard Divinity School, Angie Thurston and Casper ter Kuile, asked to interview me for a report they were writing on a range of new organizations that they believed represented a sea change in millennial attitudes toward community, personal transformation, and — to my surprise — religion. The organization that I founded…

Sailing into Starvation Island: 70 years after the end of World War II, Peace Boat visits Guadalcanal

Musicians in shell headdresses welcomed hundreds of disembarking Japanese visitors when Peace Boat docked in Guadalcanal, its final port of call, last month. Guadalcanal receives few tourists and our arrival produced a flurry of new entrepreneurs: hawkers arranged wooden canoe figureheads and bottles of pressed coconut oil on mats spread over the concourse, and an ice-cream…

Cigar Limits and Other Cuban Travel Tips

A friend of mine made the infographic below for Cheapflights.com. I thought the team did a nice job putting together what American travelers need to know to visit the Caribbean country, since President Obama lifted many restrictions last December. There are strict limits on how much liquor and cigars Americans can bring back, and not…

Indonesia’s Indigenous Communities Use Ecotourism To Secure the Rights to their Land

From Chandra Kirana in Bogor, Indonesia. Six Indigenous communities have launched an ecotourism initiative that would show off their ancestral forests in a bid to develop alternate economic models that local government in Indonesia could embrace, moving away from extractive industries such as mining and palm oil plantations. The initiative, called GreenIndonesia, would ultimately help…

The 10 Best Restaurants in Havana

This post is the latest in the series Places, Experiences and Objects to Dream About, which profiles marvelous locations, unique life experiences and objects of interest to modern explorers that Kike discovers during my travels. If you are planning a visit to Cuba sometime soon, these are some of my suggestions to enjoy a unique culinary experience in Havana. As I…

Galápagos Tourism Backfires

A squabble over tourism dollars has escalated into a dire threat to the islands’ renowned Charles Darwin Research Station. Rampant tourism growth without adequate management now endangers scientific conservation work—the very work that helps protect the creatures tourists want to see.

December 21, 2014: Reviving the Mammoth, Traveling From Canada to Tibet With 2 Kids and 0 Airplanes

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they search for enlightenment at a Buddhist monastery with their families, search for pain at high altitude, sacrifice children and llamas in Peru, recreate the mammoth, don’t finish a bucket list, rap about the wilderness, improve our IQ, figure out how to avoid avalanches in the backcountry, and photograph Europe’s large carnivores.

Reflecting on the voyage: across the Indian Ocean

After three weeks at sea with Peace Boat, charting a westerly course around the world, time has become a slippery concept. Every few days we hit a new longitude and gain an hour – an anomaly I’m told will be resolved somewhere beyond Easter Island, when we shoot through 24 of them in sixty minutes.…

November 23, 2014: Set Speed Records on El Capitan, Prosecute Poaching Kingpins and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they ride horses from Calgary to Brazil, pick the perfect bottle of wine for Thanksgiving dinner, find the best places to travel right now, come back from the dead, provide solar power for the future, protect mountain gorillas and Africa’s oldest national park, eat beef, cycle through all seasons, and teach Africa’s young women to be the continent’s future leaders.

Japan-based NGO Peace Boat sets sail from Yokohama

Hundreds of spectators gathered on the wooden decking of Yokohama’s Osanbashi international terminal to wave goodbye to Peace Boat’s 86th Voyage this Friday. Some huddled around home-made placards bearing the names of friends and relatives onboard, others held aloft renditions of Yokohama’s Bay Bridge, and one group had outfitted themselves in Santa Claus getups for…