National Geographic

VOICES Voices Icon Ideas and Insight From Explorers

Menu

Tag archives for underwater archaeology

Returning Maya Ancestors to Their Place of Origin

The team has located 15 human crania and a large number of other bones, attesting to the use of the site as a burial location.

$450,000 In Private Donations Will Allow Excavation Of Blackbeard’s Ship To Continue

  A spur-of-the-moment donation today of $32,500 allowed the North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources to meet its fund-raising goal of $450,000 to continue excavating the wreckage of the Queen Anne’s Revenge, the flagship of the legendary 18th-century pirate Blackbeard. The contribution from Rita and Eric Bigham, a retired couple who divide their time between…

Issyk Kul: The 2012 Expedition Wraps Up

With just a few days to go we found some of the most significant building features we saw all season.

Issykl Kul: Time to Get Out of Camp

To get a better sense of the context of their archaeological site, the team explores scenic mountains and other ancient ruins around the 10th largest lake in the world.

Hangout With an Archaeologist in the Field

Join Fred Hiebert and team live from Kyrgyzstan where they’re searching for signs of a legendary sunken palace, in a Google+ Hangout Tuesday, September 25th at 9:00pm ET.

2012 Issyk Kul Expedition: Meet the Team

Searching for evidence of legendary palaces isn’t a project you undertake with just anyone. Get to know the archaeologists, technicians, and others making this year’s expedition possible.

2012 Issyk Kul Expedition: Search for a Sunken Palace

Six hundred years ago the fabled Western Mongol leader Tamerlane is said to have built a fabulous palace on the shores of a lake in Kyrgyzstan. Follow along as National Geographic Archaeologist Fred Hiebert and team examine what could be its last remains.

World’s oldest town older than previously thought–and underwater

By James G. Robertson, National Geographic Digital Media A research team of Greek and English underwater archaeologists have discovered ceramics that date the world’s oldest submerged town to be 1,200 years older than previously thought, the Greek government announced today. Pavlopetri, off the south coast of Laconia in Greece, was discovered in 1967 but left…