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Tag archives for Water

Submarine Diving in Deep-Sea Galápagos: #bestjobever

What’s it like to submarine dive a thousand feet underwater to an unexplored region of the Galápagos Islands? Marine conservationist and National Geographic Emerging Explorer Jessica Cramp takes us on a journey to find out.

Melting of Totten Glacier Could Trigger 6 Foot Sea-Level Rise

A new study published in the journal Nature is drawing attention to the effect of warming water on the world’s largest ice mass, Totten Glacier in East Antarctica. Melting of the glacier, which has an ice catchment area bigger than California, could lift oceans at least two meters (6.56 feet). According to researchers who mapped the shape of…

How street art can help keep waterways clean and clear of trash

Co-authored by Erica Cirino I’m strolling down Main Street in Northport, a nautical, perhaps quintessential, Long Island village that comes complete with bay views and the scent of sea spray in the air. A friend across the street calls my name just as I’m making the difficult decision of whether or not I should enter…

Fish Run Through It: The Importance of Maintaining and Reconnecting Free-Flowing Rivers

By Jeff Opperman, Director and Lead Scientist, Great Rivers Program, The Nature Conservancy Eventually, all things merge into one, and a river runs through it.  – Norman Maclean This sparse sentence by Norman Maclean comprises some of the most beautiful words written about rivers in the English language. It captures how rivers serve as living…

Mapping out the chronic effects of silent oil spills

By Anna Kulow We are all familiar with the images from massive oil spills. A sea otter blackened by a thick coating of oil on its fur. Masses of dead fish floating in iridescent seawater. Pelicans being lifted from the water, hydrocarbons dripping from their saturated feathers. However, the majority of oil pollution in our oceans…

A Pacific salmon hub is under threat

The Skeena River snakes out of fir-lined fjords on the misty northern coast of British Columbia, and washes over a thousand-acre sandbar. Flora Bank is a biological bottleneck over which millions of finger-length young salmon enter the sea each spring. Scientist Allen Gottesfeld calls Flora Bank the “Grand Central Station” for the watershed. All streams…

Common Land, Common Ground

By Justin Adams, Global Managing Director for Lands at The Nature Conservancy. Edward Loure and The Nature Conservancy have a common story. The story is one of reducing conflict by finding common ground—in this case both literally and metaphorically. All over the world – in fact, for 2.5 billion people – lives depend on land…

Wetland Revival: Using impact investment to restore nature

 Conservation interests and agencies gathered along the Murray River in Australia earlier this month to witness the return of water to a wetland system that now rarely receives floodwater from the river, due to construction of large water-storage reservoirs built upstream that capture the river’s flow and sends it to irrigated farms.   With the twist…

Wolf – Caribou Detente? Clues Hidden on Lake Superior Islands

Qalipu, it’s called by Canada’s Mi’kmaq people. To others, it’s the elusive gray ghost of the far northern forest. Most know it simply as caribou. Woodland caribou are medium-sized members of the deer family. In Canadian provinces such as Ontario, these shadows in the forest are listed as threatened – quickly vanishing. Non-migratory woodland caribou…

Climate-Change-Related Precipitation Extremes Hard to Predict

Scientists have warned that severe drought and precipitation are among the risks of greenhouse-gas-induced climate change, but a study published in the journal Nature finds that extremely warm temperatures do not always translate into record wet and dry extremes. Highlighting the complexities in predicting the effects of planetary warming on precipitation, lead author Fredrik Ljungqvist…

Surf’s Up For Wildlife

New research published in the journal Ecology finds that a wide-variety of fish and wildlife are professional surfers. But don’t expect to see these animals in the next remake of Point Break, they don’t surf waves of water; they surf waves of food, and it may be their only way to make a good living.…

February’s Record Heat Astounds Scientists

Data released last week by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) shows that the string of monthly global heat records extended through February, when the average worldwide temperature was 2.18 degrees Fahrenheit above the 20th century average. The tenth straight record breaking month, February was the most above-normal month since meteorologists began tracking temperatures in…

Does Jakarta Have any Viable Options to Defend Itself From Ocean Inundation?

JAKARTA, Indonesia–Walking along the wall that protects north Jakarta from the sea, it is impossible to ignore the enormity–and immediacy–of water-related issues that this megacity faces. The city’s current plan of action, outlined by Wendy Koch in a recent article entitled, “Could a Titanic Seawall Save this Quickly Sinking City?,” is widely criticized as being…

Nemo and the Zombie Anemone

Comparing a bleached anemone to the undead may be a bit of a stretch, but it is fair to say a bleached anemone is hovering somewhere between life and death and depending on what happens next, it can go either way. We got a closer look at the phenomenon of bleached anemones earlier this year…

The Río Marañón Is Moving: Dam Construction in a Volatile Landscape

Explorers launched a raft expedition in Peru to collect data on the Río Marañón, the headwater stem to the Amazon River. The river is under threat of 2 approved dams and almost 20 more proposed dams. The team faced class V rapids and landslides to collect baseline data along the river corridor prior to dam construction.