National Geographic

VOICES Voices Icon Ideas and Insight From Explorers

Menu

Tag archives for weather

November 16, 2014: Speed Climb 3,000 Foot Walls, Meet the Darwin of NYC’s Rodent World and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they set a speed record on El Capitan, prosecute poaching kingpins, share survival tips for extreme weather, dig up clues on ancient tsunamis to study for future risk, hold our breath to survive a surfing disaster, call the Malagasy military for an airlift, understand the evolution of New York’s rats, and mourn the Sherpa guides and porters lost on Everest.

You Cannot Save the Climate Without Trees

The People’s Climate March that trumpeted its way through the streets of Manhattan yesterday was led by communities on the front lines of climate change—and Indigenous Peoples were at the forefront of this group.  The tropical forests where they live are not only getting hammered by changing weather patterns, drug traffickers, invasive pests, and massive…

Political and Weather Climates are Changing, But at What Speed?

The weather in Washington, D.C. finally turned hot in September, just in time for Congress to resume. We enjoyed an unusually moderate summer this year, with many days topping out in the high seventies or low eighties. Plenty of sun. San Diego weather, you might say. Before September, we were missing about two full weeks…

Dead and Lost Boobies: Harbingers of a Growing El Niño?

Starving seabirds far from home may point to a brewing El Nino in the Pacific.

Watch Red Fireworks at the Edge of Space

Sky watchers should keep their eyes peeled for “sprites” atop thunderstorms this summer.

Monster Storms Raging on Failed Stars

Hurricanes as large as planets may sweep across the face of brown dwarfs—failed stars bigger than planets but smaller than real stars. A new study looks at 44 brown dwarfs using the infrared camera of NASA’s Spitzer space telescope. The astronomers report that they recorded periodic changes in brightness and saw the largest variations ever…

Top 20 Photos of 2013 from American Prairie Reserve

Looking back over a year’s worth of photos, the prairie weaves an ever-changing tale of drama, peace, microscopic detail, magnitude, and resilience. The seasons become less defined, and the decade I’ve spent helping build American Prairie Reserve blends in a single, long journey. As you scroll through our snapshots from the field, I hope you get…

Video: Sights and Sounds of a Storm at Camp

While the caver/scientists underground remain blissfully unaware of what’s going on up top, a South African thunderstorm moves in and creates a show of sights and sounds for the rest of the team.

The Truth About Getting Stung by a Lionfish

“It won’t kill you, but it’ll make you wish you were dead”. That’s how diving instructor Mike Ryan described a lionfish sting as he briefed a boat full of people before an afternoon dive.

U.N. Agency Says Global Temperatures Hottest Since Meteorological Measurement Began

The United Nations agency charged with understanding weather and climate released new findings indicating the world experienced above average temperatures from 2001 to 2010. In fact, the first decade of the 21st century was the warmest since modern meteorological measurement began in 1850. “Rising concentrations of heat-trapping greenhouse gases are changing our climate, with far-reaching implications for our environment and our…

Geography in the News: Death on Greenland

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM and Maps.com CONSEQUENCES OF GREENLAND’S ERRATIC WEATHER              A recent BBC (May 1, 2013) article reported the death of the leader of a team attempting to hike across Greenland. Although Greenland authorities were able to rescue the remainder of the party by helicopter, 31-year-old…

Where will the polar bears go as the Arctic ice melts under their feet

The Arctic regions are home to a variety of wildlife, including polar bears (Ursus maritimus). Polar bears are generally solitary animals. At first glance, more than white, are cream-colored. In fact, the outer coat is hollow and translucent and perfectly fulfills its function of transmitting the sun’s heat to the base of the hair, where…

Sperm Works Best in the Winter, Study Finds

Spring may be when a young man’s fancy turns to love, but new evidence suggests that it’s winter when his sperm is at its spunkiest.

The Fight Against Climate Change Needs a Retrofit

The New York City apartment building where I grew up was built in the early 1960s.  The building’s heating system still has only one thermostat for more than 150 apartments, and that thermostat is usually set in the mid-70s. If it’s too hot, you must manually adjust each radiator in the apartment (and there’s one…

Winter Storm Nemo: Share Your Blizzard Pictures

If you’re braving the blizzard this weekend in New England, send your best photo to National Geographic’s Your Shot.