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Tag archives for Wildlife Conservation Society

A New Strategy for Wildlife Conservation

By Cristián Samper

At the Wildlife Conservation Society today we unveiled our WCS: 2020 strategy and, along with it, a new WCS.org website and brand identity. This announcement advances our 120-year mission to save wildlife and wild places. As the world rapidly changes, our approach to conservation must adapt and evolve. Our WCS: 2020 strategy represents our response to that change and a way to scale up our impact. Our choices today can give us a fighting chance to preserve the intricate balance of species and ecosystems that all lives depend upon.

Bears, Biking, and Building Community in the Adirondacks

By Katie Dolan [Note: This is the third and final blog about Cycle Adirondacks, which ran from August 23-29.] The final three days of Cycle Adirondacks brought bears, Blue Mountain Lake, lessons in building community, and beautiful scenery both on and off our bikes. Residents from the towns along our route welcomed riders with big…

Adirondacks Continue to Amaze Riders with Sunny Days and Beautiful Vistas

For the past few days, Cycle Adirondacks participants have seen beautiful biking habitats, rolling hills, green-hued farm fields, and quiet back roads of the Tug Hill Plateau, just west of the Adirondacks.

Celebrating the Natural Beauty of the Adirondacks

My sister, Amy, and I stop to admire the quiet vistas and look for loons and other majestic wildlife. As we pedal out of Saranac Lake in upstate New York, I start focusing on the placid waters reflecting puffy clouds rather than thinking of the 68 rolling miles ahead.

The Proposed 4(d) Rule on Ivory and How Each of Us Can Help Ensure a Future for Elephants

By John Calvelli

August 12th has been designated as World Elephant Day, an opportunity for all of us to celebrate this iconic species. Hopefully, it will also serve as a reminder that each of us can make a difference. By supporting the proposed ESA 4(d) rule we will make sure that our voices are being heard and we are playing our part to make sure that there is a future for elephants.

Red, White, and Bison: This Iconic Animal Should be Named the National Mammal of the United States

This weekend, Americans will spend the 4th of July thinking of the things that make the United States great. Of course, that means independence and freedom, and probably barbecues and fireworks as well. But another of those quintessentially great things about America is the bison, an animal that has for too long gone unrecognized as the national icon that it is.

Expedition Madagascar: Conserving Coral Reefs with Community Conservation

By Dr. Emily Darling

With colleagues from WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society), we recently surveyed the first community-led Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) in Madagascar. These areas provide genuine hope for coral reef conservation and small-scale fisheries management under the shadow of emerging oil and gas development, deforestation, illegal fishing and climate change.

Celebrating New York’s Seascape on World Oceans Day

By Jon Forrest Dohlin

You may not think that the words “metropolis and “corals” belong in the same sentence. So you might be rather surprised to hear that beautiful deep-sea coral communities can be found lurking in the deep just a few hours’ boat ride from New York City, one of most urbanized settings in the world.

Celebrating Zoos and Aquariums on Endangered Species Day

By Jim Breheny

WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society) commemorates Endangered Species Day today at all five of our wildlife parks in New York City. It is an opportunity to recognize that we are all stewards of this planet and that the fragile balance of the Earth’s biodiversity is in our hands. Many species are threatened with extinction due to human activities, but there is much that each of us can do in the name of conservation to help save species around the world.

Pangolin Prison – Part II

Warning: this article contains images that some viewers might find disturbing. – After iLCP Fellow Paul Hilton documented the bust of a massive pangolin poaching operation in Medan, Indonesia, he assists at the incineration of all of the 3000 to 4000 pangolins slaughtered by the poachers.

Pangolin Prison 

iLCP Fellow Paul Hilton documents the bust of a massive pangolin smuggling operation in Sumatra, finding over 5 tons of slaughtered pangolins, but also leading to the rescue and release of 96 of them.

The Real Penguin of Madagascar

By Graeme Patterson

It has been a decade since viewers first encountered the popular penguins of the crowd-pleasing Madagascar movie franchise. In the 2005 hit, the penguins eventually find their way to the island of Madagascar in the Indian Ocean along with their old friends from the Central Park Zoo: a zebra, lion, giraffe and a hippo who accidentally got dropped off there. Adventures ensue, the running joke is that these visitors are all out of place on Madagascar, as indeed they are. Or are they?

Celebrating a Decade of Conservation in Chile’s Karukinka Landscape

By Bárbara Saavedra and Cristián Samper

On the southern tip of Tierra del Fuego in the Patagonia region of Chile, you’ll find one of the most stunning wild places in the hemisphere, complete with bountiful peat bogs, sub-Antarctic woodlands, windswept steppes, and snow-covered mountain ranges. Spanning 1,160 square miles, the Karukinka landscape is home to Patagonia’s unique wildlife, including the endangered culpeo fox, the Andean condor, guanacos (wild relatives of the llama), and the Magellanic woodpecker, the largest woodpecker in the Americas. It’s also a place rich in plant species like southern beech, Chilean fire bush, white dog orchid, and sundew.

Conservationists Playing with Fire

By Julie Kunen

For millennia, tropical civilizations cultivated their crops through a practice known as slash and burn agriculture. In this practice, vegetation is cut down and burned to clear land and improve the soil with the resulting organic matter and nutrients. Fire also kills or drives away pests and encourages the regeneration of grasses in natural pastures. When used over extensive areas in a cycle of planted and fallowed fields, the practice is sustainable. Today, many agricultural communities that lack access to machinery and chemical inputs depend upon fire for their livelihoods, using it to clear and maintain the fertility of agricultural lands and to delimit property boundaries. Yet, fire is also a great danger to humans and there are many risks associated with the use of fire as a land management tool.

Shutting Down the Manta Trade

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic Voices blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text and photos by Paul Hilton, Fellow at the International League of Conservation Photographers.  Twice in a one-week on the Indonesia island of…